Redskins president Edward Bennett Williams switched from predictions to prayer at the team's annual welcome home luncheon yesterday.

A year ago Williams predicted the best Redskin team ever. Yesterday he told a sellout crowd of 2,000 at the Sheraton-Park Hotel that he would make no more predictions. He then referred to The Rev. Thomas Kane's invocation.

"This program opened with Father Kane's prayer for the greatest season ever," Williams said. "I think it's significant we've changed from predictions to prayer."

On a day the sponsoring Redskins Alumni Association honored Bob Brunet and Ken Houston as the outstanding Redskins of 1976 and alumni Larry Brown and Sonny Jurgensen drew louder cheers than any current player or coach, Williams capitvated the audience with anecdotes and digs at the D.C. government and Metro.

Last year, Williams' remarks irritated coach George Allen mostly because Allen did not appreciate being put on the spot.

Allen was not smiling again yesterday when Williams, referring to last Sunday's 45-7 loss to New England, said, "If that had been a fight, they would have stopped it."

Williams also noted oddsmaker Jimmy (The Greek) Snyder's recent statement that 1977 would be "a year of destiny" for the Redskins.

"A year of destiny? Maybe so and maybe not," Williams said in his final remark. "Remember one thing. Destiny is not a matter of chance; it's a matter of choice. Destiny's not a thing to be waiting for; it's a thing to be achieved."

Allen success in six seasons here increased the huge waiting list for season tickets. Williams noted.

"I want to thank the politicians . . . We need about 8,000 seats more," Williams told the audience. "They (the Armory Board) told me, 'You pay for them, then you can rent them from us'".

Williams explained that the deal would have cost the Redskins $1.17 for every extra dollar of revenue the additional seats would have generated.

Then, Williams said, the Armory Board told him, "'We're going to build you a magnificent subway station right next to RFK Stadium.'"

How great, Williams said he thought. Then he was told it would not be open at night, such as tonight when the Redskins wind up their preseason against the New York Jets, or on Sundays, their usual game day.

Finally, Williams said, "They told me, 'We're going to build a magnificent $1 million technicolor scoreboard for baseball (Washington has not had a team for six years).'

"I think they ought to take that scoreboard and shove it in the subway system."

The best one-liner belonged to Brunei, the nine-year vet who is a leader of the special teams.

As he ac to build a magnificent $1 million technicolor scoreboard for baseball (Washington has not had a team for six years).'

"I think they ought to take that scoreboard and shove it in the subway system."

The one-liner belonged to Brunet, the nine-year vet who is a leader of the special teams.

As he accepted his award, Brunet said, "Not bad for an AWB."

He paused and continued, "That's an average white back."

The luncheon was not limited to Redskins and former Redskins. Alan Ameche, the former Baltimore Colt fullback who scored the winning touchdown in pro football's first sudden-death overtime game, was awarded the alumni association's Meritorious Service Award.

It also was not limited to football. Maryland basketball coach Lefty Driesell and Bullets general manager Bob Ferry were among the head-table guests. Driesell, in fact, received resounding applause when introduced. He also found a parking ticket on his car when he left.