If the seismographs pick up tremors from the West Coast late tonight it probably won't be any fault of the San Andreas Fault - just round two in the NBA pits. That's right, the Milwaukee Bucks with Kent Benson are at the Forum for their first meeting with the Los Angeles Lakers and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar since the fateful Oct. 18 opener.

But any rumble probably will come from only clean contact. Benson says, "I'm just going to go out there and play," letting bygones be bygones. And Abdul-Jabbar can be counted on to do the same, in only his second game back since he broke his hand swelling Benson's eye in retaliation for an elbow to the body in the opening minutes of that opening date.

Minus $5,000 and his team the loser in 13 of 21 games without him, A-J came back in the late, late show Sunday night, in case you missed it in your editions, to score 21 points and take 14 rebounds against Denver - only to miss a hook shot a regulation buzzer and see the Nuggets win in overtime, 111-109.

Sunday night marked the NBA de- but of Kenny Carr. finally recovered from injury, and with both Carr and Kermit Washington from D.C. to help with the Laker frontcourt muscle, well, keep those seismographs at the ready . . .

Bygones will soon be bygones for Jackie Smith, whose 480 pass catches, 7,918 receiving yards and 40 touch-down grabs are St. Louis Cardinal records.The tight end - a 10th-round draftee from Northwest Louisiana State - announced yesterday his [TEXTS OMMITED FROM SOURCE]

BYgones will soon be bygones for Jackie Smith, whose 480 pass catches, 7.918 receiving yards and 40 touch-down grabs are St. Louis Cardinal records. The tight end - a 10th-round draftee from Northwest Louisiana State - announced yesterday his retirement as of NFL season's end. No. 3 active receiver - behind Charley Taylor, 647 catches, and Fred Biletnikoff, 564 - says he will go into the real St. Louis - "no plans to get back into football in any form" - . . . Larry Jackson, a dozen times in his 1955-68 National League pitching career with the baseball Cardinals, the Cubs and Phillies, won 13 or more games - highlighted by a 24-11 boom for Chicago in '64. Since then, he has won four terms in the Idaho legislature - and today he will take a flying swing through the state to declare his candidacy for the Republican nomination for governor. He's in insurance and brokerage in Boise . . . Ken Venturi, the network golf analyst who made his biggest mark winning 1964 U.S. Open at Congressional Country Club, has never forgotten. Here last week for the club's awards dinner, Venturi sought out William Ward, who caddied for him on the momentous occasions in enervating heat and gave Ward $100 for Christmas. Not Venturi's first such remembrance, either . . .

Fondly remembered by multitudes in the local golf community: George Diffenbaugh, the Kenwood pro who died Sunday. In his playing heyday, he was some big hitter for a little fellow. He was Mid-Atlantic club pro of the year 1957, and how appropriate that memorial service will be held Wednesday, 11 a.m., at Kenwood's first tee. . .

Another year, another wrangle over the golf-coaching position at Wake Forest, where golf is important. The university distributed notice at the weekend Big Four basketball tournament that Jesse Haddock , longtime mentor of the Deacon linksters, was coming back to the job he left 18 months ago (for Oral Roberts U., briefly, thence, to presumably greener financial pastures in private industry). But Ron Robert said they never told him he was out as coach, reassigned to other duties, viz., business manager, at Wake. He says he rejected such an offer and, "So far as I am concerned. I am still the WakeForest golf coach" . . .

Off the screen: Those projected independent-network showings of selected Eastern Eight baskeball games didn't work out . . . Seems the Redskins got out of Buffalo just in time. Buffalo Raceway conceled the opening of harness racing last night - snowstorm . . . Being a top scholar-athlete doesn't mean one is all that wise. Tom Fitch, a Kan- sas defensive back, and Mark Wichman . Bowling Green office lineman, arriving in New York for the National Football Foundation's annual awards dinner, got suckered by a cabbie into fares of $18 and $12, respectively, on a half-mile trip. But Maryland's Jonathan Claibourne , listing to their tale of woe, showed the capital smarts. Grinnign wickedly, Claiborne disclosed, "It only cost me a buck and a quarter."