The New Orleans investors beaten out of their bid to buy the Oakland A's when Denver oilman Marvin Davis came up with bigger, quicker bread have launched a last-ditched effort to get Charlie Finley's tatterdemalions into the Superdrome for 1977 baseball season.

The fellow aoee firm manages the Dome, Denzil Skinner, doubt they'll make it.

This time they're trying to up the package to $14.5 million - presumably some of it to loosen Oakland-Alameda Countys tenacious hold on that long-term lease by which Finley turns out to have imprisoned his own club. Skinner ventures that a proposal could be ready "within a week (but) . . . I don't believe they will resolve their Bay Area problem in time for any shift of franchises to happen this year."

So much for the American League. And the National Bud Herseth of Phoenix, who was willing to sell his half interest in the San Francisco Giants to the Emil Bernard bunch that wanted to move the team to Washington, finally has thrown up his hands. Herseth now says he will his 50 percent, go along with partner Bob Lurie for another year - and reveals the Giants are considering hiring a coordinator with the assignment of "waking up the team." . . .

Sigh. The San Diego Padres, who almost moved to the District a few seasons back - a scare that jogged the apathetic citizenry to take themselves out to the ball games - report record advance season-ticket sales - going on 8,000. No wonder Ray Kroc could part with $125,000-$150,000 in trade and pick up a salary even bigger in acquiring Gaylord Perry from the Rangers this week. Now Krock & Co. - McDonald's chairmen don't like red ink - are reported dangling high-pay slugger Dave Winfield as trade bait before the Yankees and Dodgers . . . What of Finley's prisoner, Vida Blue, whom Charlie O. would release in custody of the Cincy Reds for $1.75 million and minor league first baseman Dave Revering? Blue is till Bowie Kuhn's prisoner at least a couple more days - no decision before first of the week, says the commissioner who held two days of hearings on the deal he felt violated his "informal" $400,000 limit on player sales.

Cancer has done - and it took quite a while - what the 1936 and '37 New York Giants, '38 Chicago Cubs and '39 Cincinnati Reds couldn't do in his New York Yankee heyday - beat Monte Pearson. The righthander, 69, died yesterday in Fresno, Calif. In 1933-35 with Cleveland (topped by an 18-13 campaign) and 1936-40 with the Yanks, plus a closing stint with the '41 Reds, Pearson won 100 major league games, lost only 61. His high-water mark was 19.7 with the 1936 Yanks - but in the World Series he was unbeatable. For the Bronx Bombers of Manager Joe McCarthy, who preceded him in death by only a couple of weeks, it was Red Ruffing, Lefty Gomez, Monte Pearson as the annual one-two-three Series pitching punch, and: 1936 - Pearson beats Carl Hubbell, 5-2, on a seven-hitter in Game 3 (Yanks win Series, 4-2); 1937 -Pearson beats Hal Schumacher, 5-1, in Game 3 with a five-hitter for 8 2/3 innings (Yanks win series, 4-1); 1938 - Pearson beats Clay Bryant, 5-2, in game 3 on a five-hitter (Yanks win Series, 4-0); 1939 - Pearson beats Bucky Walters, 4-0, in Game 2 on a two-hitter (Yanks win Series, 4-0). Pearson's career was shortened when he tore a shoulder ligament during a duel with Bob Feller of the Indians in 1940. In later years he was county sanitarian at Fresno . . .