John Hadl, NCAA punting champion of 1959 and holder of the American Football League title-game record of 51.4 yards per punt (1965), will try to put the kick into his career again by going into college coaching.

Coach Bum Phillips of the Houston Oilers confirmed that his reserve quarterback (behind Dan Pastorini) is retiring after 16 pro seasons to join the staff at Kansas, where he was a triple-threat All America.

So Pastorini (not counting oldies like Sammy Baugh) isn't the only starting QB to double up as a punter - Hadl did it for the AFL San Diego Chargers in '64 and '65.

Just a sidelight as Hadl had a lot of big years as a passer for San Diego 1962-72 (and a lot of money as a key figure in the premerger AFL-NFL bidding wars) and went on to further glory with the Los Angeles Rams before closing out with Green Bay and Houston, last fall tossing only 11 complettions in 24 tries for 76 yards. No sweat, back in his 13th season he moved into the select circle of 30,000-yard passers.

Hadl was pro football's man of the year 1971 and MVP 1973, his Ram debut.As he leaves, Pastorini is due to sign a longterm Oiler contract today (if he didn't last night).

In San Diego, where Dan Fouts' long-term signing seems to relegate James Harris to second string, Harris - who succeeded Hadl as Ram Leader - says: "I'm trying not to think about it" . . . His quietude contrasts with San Diego's top-draw annual event, the Thunderboats Unlimited race, which may be wiped out Sept. 14-17 by the city's noise abatement officer. He says complaints have come from at least 50 residents living four or five miles away from the hydroplane course, not to mention hundreds from closer sufferers, and he has the decibel counts to prove it's bad, bad . . . Nice, quiet game in our town this weekend: Passport Scotch Platform Tennis Playoffs at Congressional and Columbia county clubs, 9 a.m. Saturday and more after lunch; that sets up semis and finals at Columbia. It's part of the $142,000 platform - tennis tour, with the Clark Graebner Doug Russell duo out to repeat over Rye, N.Y., finals victims Hank Irvine - Herb FitzGibbon . . .

Oh happy day, Clairborne Farm in Kentucky's Bluegrass is abustle in anticipation of the arrival of one of the most celebrated of foals: by Secretariat out of Fanfreluche. The mare is the 10-year-old former Canadian champion thoroughbred racer stolen June 25 and undiscovered until December, when a farm pet named Brandy - taken in from a country road where she was wandering untethered near Tompkinsville, Ky., 150 miles from Claiborne at Lexington - turned out to be Fanfreluche. As delivery nears, "probably over the weekend or early next week." Claiborne honcho Seth Hancock says it was a cock-and-bull story they put out about Fanny being a habitual aborter who needed regular hormone medication - a ploy to try to catch the thief buying some . . .

You can't call Marv Levy, the Redskin special-teams coach taking over as Kanses City Chief head coach via the Canadian Football League, a hide-bound pro. Levy, also an erstwhile William & Mary mentor, hauled in one college head coach yesterday to join his NFL staff, The Citadel's Bobby Ross to direct the the specialty units - and is angling for another U. of Delaware's highly respected Tubby Raymond, 96-33-2 since taking over the Blue Hens from Athletic Director Dave Nelson 12 years ago, will be flying to K.C. shortly to see if Levy can talk him into becoming the Chiefs' offensive coordinator . . . So the Redskins didn't approach Bobby Beathard before he quit as Miami Dolphin player personnel director; that would be tampering. But Beathard amends that the Redskins (among others) had talked to boss Don Shula about whether Beathard was available . . .

NBA violence, again: Rich Rhodes, a Chicago Bull hopeful cut in preseason, charges - $2.5 million worth - in a Charleston, Ill., (he played there for Eastern Illinois) court that Lucius Allen and the Kansas City Kings ruined his prospective pro career.Rhodes claims Allen belted him and caused a fracture and soft-tissue injuries during an exhibition game at U. of Illinois Sept. 30. Seeking equal amounts from the Kings and Allen, Rhodes alleges that Lucius "was a person of violent and disorderly propensities and of a belligerent disposition so as to render him dangerous in the safety of other basketball players" - and the Kings "owed a duty . . . to refrain from employing persons it knew or should hae known were violent, vicious and dangerous" . . .