Dave Revering must figure it's a plot of some kind to keep him from showing his stuff in the major leagues.

He kept having those big slugging years on the Cincinnati Reds' AAA farm (300 with 29 HR last year at Indianapolis) and -- understandably --couldn't break into the Riverfronters' set lineup. Then he was traded to the Oakland A's for Vida Blue, a golden opportunity, only to see Commissioner Bowie Kuhn nix it because of the $1.75 million that would accompany Revering into Charlie Finley's mitts. Okay, so last weekend he landed with the A's after all, swapped straight up for right-handed reliever Doug Bair (whom the Reds have issued uniform No. 40 that was supposed to have been Blue's). And Finley, with new Manager Bobby Winkles, ticketed Revering as the Oakland first baseman.

Came spring training this week at Mesa, Ariz., and who's on first? Revering, or --

Dick Allen!

Finley took a gamble on the unpredictable, well-traveled Allen last spring and lived to rue it by June when the aging (36 next week) slugger (351 career homers) suddenly up and quit playing.

Allen earlier had troubles with the manager then, Jack McKeon; called his teammates crybabies, and had a .240 batting average when he took a midgame shower, dressed and left, never to return after Finley suspended him 30 days.Never?

At Mesa, a surprised Winkles relates, Allen "came in and said he wanted to work," so the skipper phoned Finley, who said, all right, one more chances. . .

Could it be the Pennsylvania horseman read the Bay Area papers and learned that one of the six-person syndicate bidding $10.5 million for the A's, to keep them in Oakland, is Angie Dickinson?

Finley lawyer Neil Papiano won't identify the group, primarily from the Los Angeles area, while confirming a deal could be closed this month, but word is that the actress, actor Walter Matthau and director James Nederlander ("The Towering Inferno") are in it. And Bob Lurie, owner of the Giants across the bay, was so upset at the prospect of the A's staying that he rushed home from his team's Arizona base -- after talking with one of the would-be buyers to say, "don't do anything before you talk to me again" . . .

Over in the AL East, the Boston Red Sox had two announcements. One, from Manager Don Zimmer in Winter Haven, Fla., that his April 7 opening-day batting order is already set: Jerry Remy, 2b; Rick Burleson, ss; Jim Rice, dh; Carl Yastrzemski, 1f; Carlton Fisk, c; Fred Lynn, cf; George Scott, 1b; Dwight Evans, rf; Butch Hobson, 3b. The other, from Fenway Park: some of the legendary cheap bleacher seats ($1 a few years ago, $1.50 until reaching $2 in 1977) now will cost $3 for the big games!

Last year, despite grumbling over the 50-cent boost, the usual long lines of fans stretched down Lansdowne Street next to the "Green Monster" left-field wall to buy bleacher seats --and helped the club to its all-time attendance (2,074,000 in a 33,502-seat park). Now, for games with reserved seats sold out "well in advance" half the 7,420 bleacher spaces will go on sale in advance -- for $3; game nights they'll hold at $2. Why the extra buck for advance sales only? "When seats are filled, we have to hire more security people," said Arthur Moscato, ticket manager. . .

Ken Norton is so eager to beat Muhammad Ali to the punch against Leon Spinks he sent word yesterday he'd take a paltry $200,000 to fight the new champ in May (Las Vegas, network TV if it happens). . . Is Mama Kay Spinks really the heavy hitter in the family? The Hamilton Motor Inn has sued in Philadelphia Municipal Court for a $1,164 phone bill allegedly run up by Leon and Michael Spinks, his light-heavy brother, for conversations with mom in St. Louis. . .

Bowling break: Earl Anthony's win last week moved him past the great Dick Weber on the PBA earnings list, $556,936 to $555,573. . . For the tour event that started yesterday in Miami, Burger King put up a PBA record $150,000 purse, $30,000 to the victor . . . With the 75th American Bowling Congress tournament under way in St. Louis, the ABC recently logged a record of 48 consecutive 600-plus series in one league -- by Ron Stromfeld, 31, right-handed, of Columbus, Ohio. He broke the record of 47 by Hall of Famer Joe Wilman, Chicago, in 1946-47. . .