Olympics, anyone? Uh. no? Ah, so.

The Lake Placid Olympic Organizing Committee says it popped the question to American garment firms from Head to J. P. Stevens, from Superior Surgical Manufacturing Co. to Levi's - and, for lack of response, has turned to a Japanese company to supply some 3,000 uniforms for the staff at the 1980 Winter Games.

And now that Asics of Osaka has a tentative agreement to outfit the time-keepers, judges, maintenance staff, etc., some of the U.S. uniform makers are howling: un-American.

Asics supplied staff uniforms for the 1972 olympics at Sapporo, Japan. And, only a year ago, the Pittsburgh Pirates stirred a baseball furor by ordering their nine-color-combo double-knits from Japan. The Lake Placid staff's togs will be modeled after ski suits, but rest easy, 100 percent Amurricans, the domestic firms aren't about to let the big one get away - they're set to deal, upstairs, with the U.S. Olympic Committee to supply the uniforms of the U.S. winter athletes, the real center of attention (they hope).

Summer Olympics: A pilot program that could lead to hiring of fulltime U.S. national coaches for many international sports was initiated yesterday with announcement of a $225,000 grant to the AAU by a private company. The donor is Sun Co., Radnor, Pa., which will launch financing of a national wrestling coach and staff by presenting a $75,000 check during the World Cup wrestling tournament this weekend in Toledo, Ohio. If the wrestling program proves successful, said AAU official Joseph Scalzo sponsorship will be sought from other companies for national coaches in various other Olympic sports.

Olympics 1984: Just in case Los Angeles falls through, Mayor Jean Drapeau of Montreal has written Mayor Tom Bradley, of L.A. the Canadian sity just might - as a "last resort" - host the Summer Games again.One way, it's speculated, for Montreal to try to recover some of the multimillions it poured into building facilities for the 1976 Olympics . . .

All the major league owners gather today in Tampa, but the would-be sale of the Boston Red Sox won't be submitted. Said Joseph LaCour, a trustee and executor of the late Bosox owner Tom Yawkey, "We are ready now to file an application with the league again (but) we don't want to walk in . . . and get knocked down again like we did in Hawaii, I don't want any more surprises" - like the 11-3 rejection of the Haywood Sullivan-Buddy LeRoux purchase over the winter. This time, LaCour ventures confidence of approval since Yawkey's widow, Jean, is going in as a general partner ($3 million worth), but, "We probably won't get a meeting of the owners to ask for approval until after the season starts" . . . And if the owners do force Charlie Finley to remain in baseball this year, he declares, "I'm getting another team mascot (in place of late mule Charlie O), of jackass. His name will be Bowie K. because he's the biggest jackass I've ever met in my life" . . . The A's are the only major league team to report a decrease in advance ticket sales for 1978 vis-a-vis 1977; at least nine of the other 25 have broken or expect to break their all-time preseason sales records. But Finley just gave the Oakland ticket office the word Monday to open up for business . . .

A prime subject for NFL films come summer NFL camp could be 300-pound Bob Brown, trying to come back to the Green Bay defensive line at 38, after a year out of the league . . . Now will any baseball club pick up Larry Dierker, who despite steady buffeting by injuries and bad luck had been in the majors from his 18th birthday in 1964 until yesterday, when the St. Louis Cardinals gave up on him? He says his right arm - producer of 20 wins for Houston in 1969, a nohitter July 9, 1976, among 139 career Ws - is okay and no way, if he can't hook on in the majors, will he go to the minors: "I wouldn't degrace myself; I'd rathr bow out" . . . Buddy Bell the Cleveland third baseman, may bow out via trade soon. He's complaining the Indians' front office has a negative attitude that's "permeating the locker room." There are also rumors of the Tribe trading fireballer Dennis Eckersley, who strung up those 22 hitless innings last summer, perhaps to Boston (which would give up Ted Cox, the youngster who broke in with a record five-hit game against the Orioles last fall - and he could take Bell's position) or to Kansas City (where Clint Hurdle, 20, has been given the opening-day nod at first base over John Mayberry . . .