The Baltimore Orioles' front office has decided the 1978 baseball seas are rough enough already, it won't hassle Jim Palmer any further over his 1977 performance bonus. Same for Ken Singleton and Mike Flanagan.

General Manager Hank Peters and the agents for the three players who got their bonuses under protest will settle their grievances and counter-grievances without going to arbitration, the better to avoid any bitterness that would surface at such a hearing, according to Ken Nigro of the Baltimore Sun.

So is everybody happy? At odds repeatedly with Manager Earl Weaver and Peters, not to mention ineffective and maybe hurting in recent starts, Palmer was asked if his recent talk about wanting to be traded might now be erased? Replied the three-time Cy Young Award flinger: "No" . .

How about all those remnants of the 1974 world champion A's on the move against Oakland shedding the last of the breed with the swap of Billy North to the Dodgers; Claudell Washington changing his trim Texas garb to let shirttails hang out with the White Sox in trade for Bobby Bonds - and here's Gene Tenace with his second annual crabfest about how San Diego has shuttled him in and out of the lineup, prompting him to huddle with G.M. Bob Fontaine and to say, "A trade is the only solution." With Tenace in the second year of a six-year, $1.8 million contract, the Padres doubtless agree. . . .

And no escaping the ringleader of the old Finley gang, this time pointed to by Mickey Rivers, Yankee center fielder benched by Billy Martin for not hustling. The play for which Rivers presumes he took the rap was a shot by Amos Otis of Kansas City that sailed over the glove of the right fielder, bounced off the wall and was relayed to the plate by Rivers too late to cut down the winning run.

"I was satisfied with what I did on the play," said Rivers."Let him bench somebody else for a mistake on that one. That guy has blown a couple of games for us out there."

Reggie Reggie! "The guy," of course, was Reggie Jackson, who two games earlier ran over Rivers' sub, Paul Blair, giving Otis a game-winning inside-the-park home run . . .

Mayor Tom Bradley came through two-hour IOC grilling with its controversial bid for the 1984 Summer Olympics evidently safe - with this compromise solution: IOC will maintain its sovereignty over the Games while the L.A. organizing committee protects itself (city taxpayers, that is) by taking out insurance against any debt incurred. . . .

Ah, international sports. World Cup soccer: Defending champion West Germany has lost one of its four prospective goalkeepers for the June 1-25 competition in Argentina, Bernd Franke of Einthracht Brunswick breaking his right leg in practice (he'd rejoined his club this week after April 17 knee surgery). Irtn has lost the 10-year captain of its team, Parviz Ghlychkani, who says he won't leave NASL's San Jose Earthquakes to play midfield for his homeland because the Iranians press quoted him as praising the shah when he really regards the monarch as a "vicious dictator" (who made him a political prisoner for 45 days two years). Thousands of World Cup fans risk flu unless the Argentines can control an outbreak at a military barracks in Buenos Aires, warns the World Health Organization. Three fans were shot in Buenos Aires and dozens tear-gassed in Cordoba as ticket cues for the Cup grew unruly. Some fun . . .

Oklahoma State, hit by the NCAA with a two-year football probation four months ago, is under investigation again after a Dallas newspaper story reporting at least seven O-State players driving late-model cars financed by Oklahoma banks . . . Sam Schulman, SuperSonic owner, says the club has settled on an offer to keep center Marvin Webster in Seattle - he becomes a free agent after the playoffs - but it won't be in the "ludicrous" class. By what do you mean ludicrous, Schulman was asked. Anything like that what Denver paid to keep David Thompson, he replied . . . Sure, it's the William E. Miller Memorial Pace, not "John W.", at Rosecroft tomorrow night - and coincidentally the colt named Miller's Effort may be the Cinderalla of the cast after winning only $7,000 as a 2-year-old but is more than a dark horse. Effort beat favored No No Yankee in 1:58 at The Meadows in pennsylvania last Friday, and is handled by the all-time leading black harness driver, Lew Williams of Steubenville, Ohio.