On Bowie Kuhn's previous trip to Japan in 1974, the U.S. baseball commissioner said he would like to see a world series between the countries within five years. What Japan may get in 1979 in Notre Dame football - Japanese promoters are negotiating to move the Irish-Miami (Fla.) game slated Nov. 24 in the Orange Bowl to Tokyo - while Kuhn, visiting over there again, is now saying: 1984?

Kuhn told his hosts he hopes to see baseball included in the '84 Olympics, bringing about sort of a world series between the United States and Japan. But if he is serious about a super "serious" on the professional level, he must know that's a ways away. In Japan's majors currently, the home run leader is not Sadaharu Oh but U.S. emigre (11 career homers in the majors) Adrian Garrett, 18 to Oh's 16.

"We will both know when the time is ripe," Kuhn said of the two nations. And to help the Japanese ripen, the commissioner pointed to a newly arranged television package by which we show them how (for a pretty penny to U.S. baseball) via big-league action including World Series and All-Star Game. . .

Roberto Partarrieu, a George Mason U. senior (and former national champion in both Haiti and the Dominican Republic) is seeded No. 1 among the 208 competitors in this week's NAIA tennis tournament in Kansas City; he made the semis in both 1976 and 1977 . . . But Athletic Director Hap Spuhler & Co. won't let us forget GMU baseball: As the NCAA Division II season wound down, Patriot seniors Stan Reese (Fairfax High) and Dave Miller wound up as national leaders - .390 batsman Reese with 71 runs batted in and .321 hitter Miller with 56 stolen bases (in 60 tries). Former GMU first baseman Jerry Dellinger (Oakton High) recently became the school's first representative in organized ball, and, yes, that was he in the No. 5 spot in the Kinston, N.C., batting order in the Alexandria Dukes box scores over the weekend . . . GMU has petitioned to move up to Div. 1 in baseball, which James Madison U. downstate did this year - and produced one of the this year - and produced one of the nation's top hitters in senior oufielder Roger Lee of Warrenton: .462 with 10 HR, 55 RBI and a good bet - with another college baseball draft almost upon us - to follow 1976-77 mates Jim Barbe (Arlington), Mike LaCasse (Falls Church), Billy Sample and Todd Winterfeldt into the pro ranks . . .

Blane McDonald, ex-T. C. Williams High, knows all about the baseball draft and the third time could be the charm. A catcher, he was drafted in the first round by the Chicago Cubs in January 1977, couldn't agree on terms and stayed in junior college at South Florida; in June the Cincinnati Reds picked him on the second round but, again, the offer wasn't right. So the Alexandria husky settled in at Florida State and this spring, at last report was leading the Seminoles in hitting at .410 and playing superb defense behind the plate. Bill Saunders, a Northern Virginia baseball buff (also pointing out that Rob Teegarden of Jefferson High was starting in right field for U. of Florida and leading the Gators in RBI), sends a clipping from the Tallahassee Democrat profiling McDonald as "a ballplayer you want your son to grow up to become, a college level combination of John Havlicek and Steve Garvey . . . but nicknamed (by teammates) 'P.B.'" P.B.? Passed ball? No way. "Plain Blane" . . .

When degrees are given at Maryland on Friday, look for John Williams, 265-pound L.A. Ram offensive tackle - he gets his doctorate of dental surgery. And he did it in five offseasons, sometimes spending up to 14 hours a day in the U-Md. School of Dentistry clinic . . . Also in College Park, 1977 marketing grad Patti Wessel, who got some on-the-job training at the basketball nationals in L.A., has been named assistant sports information director - to publicize the 10 women's sports programs . . .