Rawly Eastwick to Philadelphia. Orlando Cepeda to federal prison. Earl Williams to any big-league club that answers his ad. Baseball figures on the move, and Rod Carew - "Carew," declares Calvin Griffith, "will remain a Twin."

Trading deadline falls tonight, but for the pastime's No. 1 hitter and No. 1 candidate for barter, it fell last evening when the Minnesota club announced: "after discussions with Manager Gene Mauch and his executive staff and after weighing all factors involved, President Griffith has terminated all efforts to trade All-Star first baseman Rod Carew" (who was en route to the ball park for the Cleveland game when the word was issued that he will stay with the Twins at least through this season).

The Yankees, one of the American League contenders bidding for Carew, settled for unloading Eastwick, former ace reliever of the Cincinnati Reds, and his $850,000, five-year contract and taking on resident Phillie "flake" Jay Johnstone. The lefty-swinging outfielder hit .329. .318. .284 the past three years as a platooner but this year is .179 in limited duty - while Eastwick, scarcely needed wilth Sparky Lyle and Rich Gossage in the New York pen, was 2-1 in only 24 innings . . .

Cepeda, one of the game's big names as a slugging first baseman 1958-74, and an accomplice in smuggling marijuana from Colombia into Puerto Rico in 1975 were sentenced in federal court, San Juan, to five-year terms. U.S. Circuit of Appeals in Boston had upheld their November 1976 conviction, and Judge Hernan Pesquera rejected pleas for reduced sentences. Six witnesses testified that Cepeda was a great influence on youth as a coach in the town of Juncos on his native island. The best the "Baby Bull" could get out of the judge was assurance he will be eligible for Parole on two years - and permission to turn himself in at a mainland prison to begin his stretch . . .

Earl Williams, National League rookie of the year in 1971 when he hit 33 of the 138 homers he amassed in eight years with four clubs, has been sitting in his Alameda, Calif., apartment waiting (without a telephone) for a call since the A's released him last year. Then, last week, a classified ad ran in the New York Times, placed for $352.80 by his mother in Montclair, N.J.: "Employment wanted by baseball player," Williams' name in large type, "Excellent Health - No police Record. Have Bat - Will Travel - Will Hustle." Williams, at 29, expresses puzzlement at his idle state, although, "The only thing I can think of is that I have a bad reputation in baseball. When I was at Baltimore, I had some difficulty wilth Earl Weaver. But that was in '73 and '74, and since then I've been Clean Gene . . .Maybe at one time I didn't hustle all the time but that's long since over." Why no phone? He got tired of answering it last year, Williams says . . .

What's doing around here? Starting with 9 a.m. ceremonies today, the 13th annual U.S. Marine Corps Youth Physical Fitness National Championships on the parade field of the Marine Barracks, 8th and I Streets SE. Admission free as 108 high schoolers from 12 states compete in situps, pushups, pullups, standing broad jump and 300-yard shuttle run . . .Tonight at Four Mile Run Park, it's Camp Virginia Jaycees Night at the Alexandria Dukes-kinston Eagles game. Proceeds from all tickets sold by Jaycees go toward summer camp for handicapped youngsters . . .

Even the most conservative of the NBA 76ers drives a Rolls Royce, we learn with the arrest of Henry Bibby on I-295 in Philly's Jersey suburbs for allegedly speeding, 79 mph, without a license yet . . .Remember when Cincy pitcher Pedro Borbon dug his teeth into a Pittsburgh Pirate during a midgame brawl a few seasons backs Borbon has just been fined $200 in municipal court, Cincinnati, for irreparably damaging 29 pieces of rented furniture - 11 of which had "doggy bites in them." Doggy bites?