At case, Bulletmaniacs, the NBA has left Elvin Hayes off without a fine for knocking referee Karl Strom as a "roader" during the finals. Just wasn't worth it, said a league spokesman, so free speech prevails - just as the Big E said the night he sounded off, "They can't fine me - this is free speech" . . .

Not such happy news for SuperSoniacs: Marvin Webster met 4 1/2 hours Tuesday and three hours Wednesday with New York Knick officials in the Apple. Said Larry Fleischer, the Eraser's lawyer, "We did not discuss contract terms.Marvin was here . . . to find out more about the area, who his teammates will be, his relationship with the coach and what chances of success he believes the Knicks will have next season. These factors, together with the monetary situation, will determine where Marvin will play." So talk, talk, says Seattle owner Sam Schulman, with all the clubs you want, "but if I lose Marvin, I'm going to demand some tremendous compensation" . . .

And as owners of the Boston Celtics and Buffalo Braves met in L.A. yesterday to hammer further toward swapping so that movie mogul Irv Levin can operate the Braves in San Diego while John Y. Brown takes over in Boston, another Knickerbocker angle: Red Auerbach to New York? "Sources close to" Auerbach, architect of the once-pound Celtic dynasty, say he would switch his general-managing skills to Madison Square Garden rather than work for Brown. FanFare couldn't track down the Redhead at Chevy Chase playground or wherever he might be scouting the old hometown . . .

George Steinbrenner, again. Incensed at the twin loss to the Brewers, the Yankee owner marched into the press box to say fie on the "guys who make up the American League schedule" for having "us playing a crucial game with the Red Sox one night and a doubleheader in Milwaukee the next." Responded AL president Lee MacPhail: "The 1978 schedule made up by the league . . . had open dates for New York for June 28 and 29. The twi-night doubleheader scheduled in Milwaukee on June 28 was arranged by the two teams with league concurrence by changing games previously sheduled for other dates" . . .

If someone has to answer to Big George for that, in Boise, Idaho, they have to answer to a Higher Authority. Brad Kramer, a player for the Boise Buckskins of baseball's Northwest League for rookies, has been cut by God and Manager Gerry Craft.

God? Since training camp, Buckskin executives have talked of the Lord's assistance in forming the independent club, and following eight straight losses after an opening win, Craft optimistically said it was just a test by God and Jesus Christ. Kramer wasn't that bad a player, Craft told the Idaho Statesman newspaper, but there were other factors, and, "Well, He (God) made it very clear to me and I called Lanny (Moss, club owner) and it was confirmed to her in the Bible." Anyway, Kramer, a nephew of former Packer football stay Jerry Kramer, told how he was summoned to Craft's hotel room and:

"Finally he (Craft) said he was reading the Bible the night before and in some passage God had spoken to him directly. God let him know that Brad Kramer was no longer supposed to play on this Buckskin team. Jody Campbell (player-coach) confirmed it . . . they were reading the Bible together . . . they said God didn't want me on the team" . . .

"Crazy John" Zages, 34, nationally known speedboat racer, crashed at 100 mph on a test run up the James River in his Richmond home territory, and divers sought his body yesterday. "This was the way he would have wanted to go," said Thomas Moore, Mechanicsville, Va., who helped finance the $14,000, 20-foot craft that struck an object, flipped and broke up. "It just wasn't the place" . . . Dennis Balagna, 21, of Kansas City, the Big Eight freshman defensive player of the year 1975 as a Kansas linebacker now headed into his senior year, was killed in Topeka when the 10-foot ditch he was working in on a project caved in; Jayhawk teammate John Mascarello, 22, a graduating guard, escaped with chest bruises . . .