Frank Herzog the inimitable, fulfilled on radio now that he has play-by-played the Bullets all the way to the world championship, is going full time to the one and only TV-9 sports staff so the NBA champions will be switching to a new radio voice again this year.

Tony Roberts again? Dunno, but whoever, it will be the station's choice, not the team's and remember now that the twain have divided into WDVM-TV and the 1500-AM outlet, the radio station is the one and only WTOP . . . The Bullets will have their hands full, or something, anyway, with their tryouts for the 1978-79 edition of the Bullettes. Candidate tryouts for the cheerleading squad (female, 18 and up, call Charlie Williams, 350-3400 ext. 375) are on tap tomorrow at 8 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. and next Wednesday at 8 . . .

Still the most dangerous game: World Cup skiing star Lise-Marie Morerod, 22, is in a Lausanne hospital with a fractured spinal column, pelvis and right shoulder and out of 1978-79 competition. Auto crash. The Swiss national ski trainer, Pierre-Alain Bruchez, was driving, when their vehicle and another collided at a crossroads near Martigny, Switzerland; Bruchez was not seriously hurt . . .

An inimitable indeed was Henry Longhurst, who has died at 69 at his Sussex, England, home after a long battle with cancer. The one-time Cambridge University golf captain and 1937 German Amateur champion made a near-legendary mark in 40 years as golf correspondent for the Sunday Times of London. He gained further renown on BBC, ABC and CBS telecasts of the royal and ancient game; as AP put it, "a master of dry wit and understatement, he brought a civilized, literary style to television golf commentary." Amen . . .

Kicked out: Baltimore Colt cuts include Mike Sochko, the Maryland punt-n'-place booter, and Bruce Allen, former Richmond punter and sometime sideline aide to daddy's Redskins. And Duane Carrell, the onetime Wilson (D.C.) High athlete who has punted his way practically all around the NFL since 1974, told his last employer, the St. Louis Cardinals, he's retiring to a food brokerage firm in Dallas . . . Kicked in: Well, kicked open, anyway, the manager's office door in the Texas Ranger clubhouse, by owner Brad Corbett. His face red with anger and black and blue from a recent fall down restaurant stairs, Corbett blasted his way into a postgame interview of Manager Billy Hunter after his slumping heroes booted away Saturday's game to Milwaukee, shooed away the media and reread the team the riot act. Like Ray Kroc and Gussie Busch in recent weeks (let's leave George Steinbrenner out of this one), Corbett had berated his club as "dogs on the field and dogs off the field" on July 4. This time, after apologizing "if I was rude," Corbett stood four-square behind his manager - "I asked if he would like a five-year contract but Billy told me he just wanted a year at a time" - and "told Billy that the first guy you don't want on this ball club (he's gone) . . . I don't give a damn what kind of a contract he has" . . .

Charles O. Finley is feeling so chipper now - "Never better" - he says the Oakland A's are not for sale now, nor will they be at the end of the season." Finley says Marvin Davis of Denver "doesn't have enough money to buy the Oakland A"s" now that Charlie O. is over the depression that followed his wintertime heart surgery. Not that he may not try to move the club out of Oakland.

The cat was let out of the bag prematurely about the champion Bullets going to Israel as a team, Sept. 3, the club says - make that tentative. But if it pans out, Kevin Grevey's appearance in the 20th annual Maurice Stokes Memorial game Aug. 15 at Kutsher's (Kosher) Country Club, Monticello, N.Y., may be a good acclimatizer. Red Auerbach, president of the Stokes foundation, annually assembles an all-star NBA cast in memory of the late NBA player and benefiting former players in financial straits (without pensions to help) . . .

Old Jim Boston knuckled a one-hitter recently as the Savannath Braves beat the Charlotte Orioles in Class AA Southern League ball - but maybe he wouldn't have if Scott Christopher were there. Christopher, the former Maryland Terp captain from Falls Church, had a nice rookie year, batting and base stealing, in '77 with Baltimore's Baby O's Class A club in Miami, then was assigned to Charlotte. Come spring, the organization changed its mind, told him to return to Miami to work on switch hitting and center fielding. He almost quit, then buckled down to it, but struggled in the low .200s - until he found himself and stroked a merry .375 for the month of June. But that wasn't the peg on which the Miami News hung a heavy profile story of Christopher and wife Sharon, whom he met on the College park campus - he's putting his off-field hours into "The Tale of the Roving Mobilean." What's that? A three-volume science-fiction novel that, who knows, may put "Star Wars" in the shade . . . Another success, so far, story: Bob Hamilton, out of Suitland H.S. and the Clark Griffith and Industrial leagues (and a 1974 Oriole draftee, unsigned) made first-team All-America as a .399-hitting center fielder at David Lipscomb College in Nashville - and on the Furth of July signed with the Cincinnati Reds' Southern League team, the Nashville Sounds.