What's all the excitement we were hearing on the radio about the Baltimore Colts, in a letter from the Los Angeles County Supervisors to owner Robert Irsa, being invited to move in and supplant the Rams in the Coliseums as they move to Anaheim in 1980?

Tut-tut.

Not only did the Colts yesterday seal their deal to buy a 100-acre suburban Baltimore tract for a training facility and corporate headquarters, but we have in hand a copy of a letter from Kennech Hahn, a member of the L.A. Board of Supervisors who also is vice president of their Coliseum Commission:

"Dear Mr. (Edward Bennett) William. Would our team be interested in exploring the possibility of moving to Los Angeles . . . ?

A swifty in the National Sports Festival in Colorado was Liz Young. U. of D.C. soph. She won the 200 metres in 23-35 and took second in the 100 meters. . . . Fairfax's Ginger Rouse, the N.C. Stater our of Robinson High, played for Chris Weller's champion East team in the Festival women's basketball and has been selected for the U.S. team to train at Squaw Valley, Calif., for the 1979 Pan Am Games. . . . Among 12 standout college players named to the U.S. men's basket team headed for the Gagarin Cup international round-robin in Moscow Aug. 23-30: Craig Shelton of Georgetown. . . . Gu's women's basketball coach. Francis Carr, landed the tallest female Hoya player ever in 5-11 Kerry Keefe, a long haul any way you look at it; she's from Bainbridge Island. Wash., where she led her team to state runner-up laurels.

Another Bullet headed for a Kutsher's all-star exhibition in the Catskills in August: West Unseld, in the Sports Academy game for pension fund and other good cause . . . Tony Roberts of WRC and Mutual says he has such a heavy NFL game of the week, or games - Sundays and Monday nights - on tap, he's hardly had a chance to think about possibly returning as Bullet radio play-by-play man . . . Len Hathaway? Heading south, you right tune in WMAL's former Redskins reporter on your car radio out of Columbia, S.C. . . . Cureton Johnson, Howard U.'s sports information coordinator for four years, reflected, upon his departure now to "my hometown of Raleigh, N.C., to pursue a life in the Christian ministry," that the Howard Morgan State rivalry, especially in football, made it all worthwhile - classic, "much like a cocktail mixed with spring water" . . . The Billy Martin rehiring has saved for the world the Martin-George Steinbrenner commercial in which the Yankee manager-in-waiting and owner disagree over whether the beer is "less filling" or has "great taste." Presumably, Martin's canceled Yankee Franks commercial is back on the New York air, too . . .

Three of college football's greatest of yesteryear died in the past couple of weeks: Joel Hunt of Texas A&M, whose 19 touchdowns and 128 points his senior year when he quarterbacked the Aggies to an 8-0-1 campaign in 1927 still stand as Southwest Conference records. Bill Fincher, All-America end at Georgia Tech 1916-20. Ted Shipkey, a star end on Coach Pop Warner's 1924-26 Stanford teams (twice in the Rose Bowl) . . .

Fired managers? The Clark Griffith League is finishing its regular season this week without one whose passion for baseball knows no bounds: Edsel Martz. Fielding a team in two leagues here and one in Baltimore, he stretched things too thin, according to Mike Vlabos. Griffith president, and a couple of rules got bent. Martz, who schools his prospects around the calendar, come snow or high water, evidently went too far with some of the lads and their parents with back-to-back doubleheaders in the Griffith League at Fairfax and the Industrial League at Cosca Park on one near-100-degree day . . .

Martz acknowledged that, and that his team was ousted from the Griffith League for using an under-age player but said, "Sixteen may be his chronological age, but it's his baseball age that counts." And with the Martz schedule of upward of 100 summer games and 200 in a year, he allowed that his charges put on some baseball age early. "Look at Pete Rose, or Eddie Stanky - they didn't have the natural talent, but they practiced what I preach: 'To develop a skill you must use'" . . .