Lee Elder swings into PGA action at Oakmont not only a winner of $53,000-plus for his last three events on the tour, but as winner of the right to operate - and renovate, he is determined - the Langston municipal course here.

The National Park Service, after lengthy consideration of the bids of Elder and a couple of others, has decided in favor of the man who represents Washington, D.C. in golf's big league. Word is that he will take over as concessionaire perhaps this month at the old course on Benning Road in Northeast that he aims to recondition all the way to a rebuilt clubhouse, if the Park Service approves the plans. And another of the good black players, Al Green, is lined up to be resident pro at Langston; he used to be pro at Eisenhower muny course near Annapolis, more recently at the Princess Hotel club in the Bahamas.

It all sounds like a promising opportunity to develop young Elders and Greens from the inner city, and beyond, since the man has long eyed upgrading of his "Lee Elder youth program". . .

Here's yet one more jockey tragedy: Roger Van Hooser, injured July 5 when a mount broke down at Charles Town, is in University Hospital, Baltimore, for surgery - paralyzed from the waist down, no use of his hands . . .

Around the mound: Mark Flydrych zipped through five hitless innings, nary a ball leaving the infield off his deliveries, in his third stint for Detroit's Lakeland, Fla., Class A club.So, after that fine 65 pitch effort against Dunedin, and a scheduled three-inning run Saturday to prove his pitching shoulder is healed, The Bird could be gardening and flinging against the Texas Rangers next Wednesday . . .

The tumbling Texas Rangers got something above $100,000 from the Yankees for reliever Paul Lindblad, 36, but Tuesday night's deal leaves Brad Corbett a pretty big loser since he paid $400,000 for the ex-Nat in February, 1977, and got nothing earth-shaking out of him; remember the flap when Bowie Kuhn held up the deal before letting Charlie Finley have all that loot . . .

Quick now, baseball fans, who was the only White Sox pitcher with back-to-back 200-strikeout seasons? Tom Bradley, 1971-72, and now the 1968 Maryland All-America out of Falls Church - he came back to College Park offseasons from his 53-58 career in the majors and earned a degree cum laude - has succeeded Jack Lamabe as baseball coach at Jacksonville U. Recruiting? Bradley, 31 says, "I do have a good base in the Washington, D.C. area . . ."