Major league baseball managers says the best of their lot this year was Milwaukee's George Bamberger: he collected 11 votes. Bob Lemon eight, the others were scattered among five skippers in the annual Sporting New poll . . . East Indies (independents) major college football ranking: 1, Penn State; 2, Pitt; 3, Navy . . . The Rev. Jesse Jackson will officiate at the Jum Gilliam funeral today at Los Angeles' Trinity Baptist Church; burial follows at Inglewood . . .

Class, Inc.: GORDIE HOWE, who spent the first quarter-century of his hockey career with the Red Wings, bought space in a Detroit newspaper to say yesterday to the cheering 14,119 who turned out last week to see the 50-year-old and the New England Whalers play an exhibition against the NHL club: "The World Hockey Association, my family and I wish to extend our deep appreciation to you for the heart-warming response and welcome."

Archbold Stadium, home of the Syracuse U. football team for '71 years, will be demolished after the Nov. 11 Navy-Syracuse game. A $26 million, 50,000-seat domed stadium will replace the old concrete structure, with completion scheduled for the 1980 opener. In '79 the Orange will play home dates at Buffalo's Rich Stadium, Cornell's Schoellkopf Field - and, just announced, Penn State-Syracuse next Oct. 20 will be in Giants Stadium in Jersey . . . U. of Richmond football department is crushed by City Council 8-0 vote to halt plans to expand 22,500-seat City Stadium. Spider Coach Jim Tait says the decision - neighborhood residents had complained of the prospect of massive traffic and parking problems - means "we won't be in the city . . . have to start the process of finding a site, either in the county or remotely on campus. We'll have to come to grips with that decision if we want to stay in Division I." NCAA now requires that a school have a 30,000-seater (or average 17,000 attendance) to play with the big boys . . . George Mason, Towson State and U. of Baltimore moving into Division I (though no football at GMU and Baltimore) has brought end of the 38-year-old Mason-Dixon Conference. Only Mount St. Mary's (Div II) and Frostburg State (Div III) were left with them; in its heyday, the Mason-Dixon had 16 schools in Maryland, Virginia and the District.