Boston sources have tossed into the Celtic coaching forefront the name of Indiana U's Bobby Knight as the man Red Auerbach wants to see first, and as a dark horse, Georgia's Hugh Durham-who coached Celt mainstay Dave Cowens, abdicating coach, at Florida State . . . But would Knight want to cut out after another fab recruiting season in which the Hoosiers landed one of the land's top guard prospects, Isiah Thomas of Westchester (222). St. Joseph; Indiana's 1979 "Mr Basketball," 6-8 Steve Bouchie of Washington , Ind., and the state's leading scorer, 6-3 Chuck Franz of Clarksville?

Not only was Bill Cofield's job at Wisconsin saved when his beleaguered Badgers swept their last four Big 10 games (boosted immeasurably by 6-8 soph Claude Gregory from Coolidge High here)-including infliction of the loss that Michigan State "needed" before going into the NCAAs, but he's getting increasing company in the ranks of blacks in college basketball headcoaching. New Mexico State appointed one this week in Weldon Drew, a long-time Houston high school coach who was assistant to N.M. State's Ken Hayes, who skipped along to Oral Roberts U. this week. A day earlier, U. of Detroit did likewise in promoting Willie McCarter to replace Dave Gaines, a former Globetrotter moving to San Diego St.

Big Mu-and he is much bigger than 7-2, swear witnesses to his November game against GU at Starplex (not Cap Centre; sorry) - led China's Aug. 1 Army team to a second victory over the touring U.S. college all-star hoopsters, 72-69, in Peking. Yank team, 1-2 on trip with two games to go in Shanghai, includes familiar Carl Nicks, Bill Hanzlik, Kiki Vandeweghe, Kyle Macy; is coached by Gene Bartow. And chief of mission is GW's and Reston's own J. Dallas Shirley . . . Maryland's Tara Heiss and Kris Kirchner and rest of U.S. team for Pan Am Games this summer meanwhile head for South Korea as the national entry in the women's world championships Seoul April 29-May 13 . . .

Eddie Wilson, a rookie outfielder with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1936, was leading the National League in batting at 347 until a beaning blurred his vision and ended his season after 52 games; he came back to play 36 games (222) in 1937, then sank to the minors. Edward F. Wilson died this week, at 69, in his native Hamden, Conn. . . . and Frank Kelleher, 62, for many years third baseman for the Pacific Coast League's Hollywood Stars (plus a 47-game, .167 shot in the Cincinnati Reds' 1942-43 outfields), passed on in Stockton, Calif. . . .