Baseball's 1979 All-Star ballots are off to the printer, but who'll make the calls at the 50th clash of American and National League luminaries July 17 in Seattle's Kingdome?

The last of the "real" major league umpires, rookie Ted Hendry, notified the AL yesterday he intends to terminate his contract and join the 51 other regulars on strike. (That's a greater sacrifice than any of the 28 laid down by major league leader Ozzie Smith of San Diego last season or the AL-leading 25 sac bunts by Texas' Bert Companeris-who fails to make the 1979 star ballot.)

Hendry must work 10 more days before he can join the job action. Caught in the middle of the dispute between the umpires and the leagues, Hendry had signed before the troubles erupted and was advised by Richie Philips, attorney for the Major League Umpires Association, to abide by his agreement.

"I'm here to submit my resignation," Hendry told a New York news conference called by Phillips yesterday. "...I've fulfilled my obligation. This was the easiest decision I ever made in my life. I've been so humiliated for the last two weeks."

Now he joins nonworking colleagues including Paul Pryor, the only regular NL umpire signed for 1979, who ower the weekend completed his requirement to work until his 10 days' notice of joining the walkout was up.

Hendry said he was embarrassed by the performance of the replacement umpires who worked with him the first 10 days of the season. He declared: "Incompetent?...They're terrible...amateur...They don't want to work. They're afraid. How can you work when you're scared?"

Joining the amen chorus: the players of the Cincinnati Reds, who have agreed unanimously to write Commissioner Bowie Kuhn urging him to intercede in efforts to get the regular umpires working...

Campaneris missed the list of printed nominees on the fans' All-Star ballot, again underwritten by Gillette (so you don't have to go to the ballpark to get one) even though the number has been upped to 72 in each league (nine at each position instead of the previous eight). The Red Sox lead with nine nominees, but write-in space again is provided for blooming rookies or unexpectedly hot vets...

It was off to Huntsville (Tex.) state prison for Bob Hayes, former Olympic sprint king-Dallas Cowboy flash, upon formal confirmation by Judge Richard Mays yesterday of the five-year sentence he imposed March 23 for drug trafficking. Hayes had been out on $30,000 bond, now won't be out for at least 10 months....

Joe Kapp's seven-year legal battle against the National Football League has run aground for good-the Supreme Court refusing to hear the old quarterback's appeal from back-to-back sackings in federal court.

The 1969 MVP (for leading the Minnesota Vikings to the Super Bowl) agreed by "memo" in October 1970, after balking at Vike terms and being traded to New England, to play for the Patriots the rest of that season and all of the 1971 campaign for a then-record $600,000 salary. In January 1971, though, he refused to sign a "standard player contract" with the Pats as required by the NFL constitution; he said it bound players by a variety of rules that violated antitrust laws. Courts eventually found some of those rules illegal, leading to the current free-agent system, but in the case of Kapp, it was deemed he was not personally damaged by them-that he, in effect, was an injury-prone player of declining abilities who simply decided to quit football so he could seek work in movies...

Tonight's the night, 6:30 at St. Anthony's Catholic Church in Fort Lauderdale, that Chris Evert and John Lloyd tie their tennis strings into a knot. A reception will follow at the Lago Mar Beach Club for John and Chris Evert Lloyd, as she wishes to be called upon returning to the net wars after honeymooning at an undisclosed spot...

American U. has dipped into happy-hunting-ground New Jersey to put 6-foot-8 center Raymond McCarthy, averager of 17.8 points, 10 rebounds for Pittman H.S., into a new jersey, AU basketball style...

Now that Ron Lyle has been acquitted of murdering an associate in Colorado, he surfaces in the ring (and on ABC-TV) in a 12-round heavy set-to with Scott LeDoux in Las Vegas May 12...

Oh, about the umpiring,did Bowe Kuhn turn a deaf ear? No, sir. He issued a statement late in the day about what fine men league presidents Lee MacPhail (AL) and Chub Feeney (NL) are. He added, "Obviously, the clubs are supporting them overwhelmingly." And he said if the umps sign "their contracts and return to work, I think the problems are such that they wouldn't defy solution." CAPTION: Picture, Bob Hayes: off to prison.