Billy Kilmer got tossed for a loss, it would seem, with the Minnesota Vikings' signing Monday of ex-Eagle, ex-Bengal reserve quarterback John Reaves.

But hold on! The Vikings are about to sign Jake off and represented by the same agent (Jack Mills). Look for confirmation today, the Vikes tell The Post's Dave Brady, that free safety Scott is being hauled aboard for a 10th NFL campaign.

So don't write off Kilmer as a Minnesota prospect despite the following:

Mike Lynn, Vike general manager, said on the weekend he was considering Kilmer the free agent or Ken Stabler, via trade with Oakland, for insurance at Fran Tarkenton's abandoned post. Now Lynn remarks, "Claiming Reaves on waivers doesn't change our thinking concerning (holdout) Bob Lee and (draftee) Steve Dils. We still are going to do everything we can to get both Bob and Steve Dils. We still are going to do everything we can to get both Bob and Steve signed and in camp (along with holdover Tommy Kramer) . . .

"But it does mean that we will have to reassess our situation in regards to the other two quarterbacks who have been mentioned, Kilmer and Stabler". . .

The American Grand National, horsedam's oldest and most prestigious, U.S. steeplechase, is movin' on south again. A fixture at Fair Hill, Md., since 1972, when it shifted from the New York City area where it began in 1899, the Frand now goes to Foxfield, Va., near Charlottesville.

Ray Wolfe, Foxfield racing director, made the announcement yestarday that the National Steeplechase and Hunt Association has approved running the event this fall, and every fall, as part of the regular Foxfield meeting . . .

Funeral services are scheduled in Chicago today for John D. Holland Jr., executive v.p. of the Cubs 1972-78; he died Sunday at 69 . . . Al Rosen, the N.Y. Yankee president, visited Billy Weinberger, for whom he used to work at Las Vegas' Caesars Palace, and the word is circulating that the old Cleveland slugger (two homers, five RBI in the All-Star Game 25 years ago) will be changing jobs again. Weinberger soon will be opening the Bally Manufacturing Co. casino-hotel operation in Atlantic City. Rosen reportedly wasn't too happy with boss George Steinbrenner's removal of old Indian pal Bob Lemon as manager . . . Joe Coleman, who won 20, 19 and 2o games his first three years for Detroit after the Senators shed him in the infamous Denny McLain trade, has bounced back to the majors. Pennant-minded Pittsburgh called him up from Portland's Coast League bullpenn . . .

Bowie Kuhn encores from the All-Star Game by hosting the 18th annual Congressional baseball game July 26, a 7:15 p.m. prelude to Alexandria versus rediscovered seats from the commissioner's boyhood haunts, Griffith Stadium, sold like hotcakes. The day after we let out the word some were available at Rosecroft Raceway, the track's Jim Wilhelm ventured, "If we'd had as many baseball fans show up at games as swamped us - a real cross-section - to put those seats in restroom, rec room, poolside, patio, bar or whatever, we wouldn't have lost the team. Walter Johnson's grandson bought six." That would be Henry Thomas of Olney, who is doing a biography of the Big Train . . . Ah, the Senators 'Twas truly moving the other day to hear, live-on-tape on Mac McGarry's WRC-AM show, Ron Menchine's description of the never-completed last inning of the Nats' last game in RFK . . . Ah, the Orioles. Demand for tickets for Saturday's team-jersey night, Baltimore versus Angels, is so hot that 21,000 reserved general admission seats go on sale in Memorail Stadium at 9 a.m. today; a Ballmer baseball rarity, such an advance sale . . .

"Welcome to Sam Nassi's wonderful world of basketball," Coach Bobby Leonard quipped to 6-10 Mickey Johnson as five-year Chicago Bull vetern switched NBA allegiance to the Indiana Pacers. Evidently new Pacer owner Nassi is set to spend big to make the club a winner. Johnson, who played out his Chi contract, not only is a 15-point, 8-rebound average (18.3 points in '77-78), but Leonard made sure everyone noticed, "Mickey was second to Rick Barry among forwards in the league last year with 380 assists." . . .

Lee Elder, Washington's pride of the PGA Tour and franchised this year to operate the District's Langston course, has filed a $950,000 suit charging that four Georgia men sought to take advantage of his name and reputation in a fraudulent scheme to obtain a contract from the City of Atlanta to operate public golf courses.