Roosevelt Hall of Oxen Hill has been bowling 70 to 100 games a week since the end of May to prepare himself for the All American Youth Bowling Championship that opened yesterday and will continue through Saturday in Springfield. About 200 high school bowlers from the United States and Canada are participating.

Hall, a 16-year-old junior at Oxen High, qualified for the tournament by averaging 191-25 pins above his season average -- to make the boys' open bracket, reserved for those averaging 175 or better.

Hall was wondering where in the country he would be spending the week vacationing and bowling, when he learned the national tournament would be held at the Fair Lanes Springfield, a short drive from his home.

"I was really looking forward to going to California or at least someplace where I would have to fly. But I decided this couldn't be too bad after I heard about the $1,000 scholarship. I didn't really care where the tournament was after that," Hall said.

Five Washington-area bowlers are among those competing for the $28,000 in college schlorships -- $1,000 each -- awarded by Coca-Cola and the National Bowling Council on the basis of tournament performances on the lanes and on a scholastic aptitude scheduled today.

The girls open bracket begins at 150. All bowlers below the cutoff averages will compete in the handicap division.

Hall wasn't sure how the exam scores would have computed with the pinfall to determine the 28 prizewinners, so he wants to finish first in his division to make sure he doesn't miss out. Scholarships automatically go to the four finalists.

The girls open bracket begins at 150. All bowlers below the cutoff averages will compete in the handicap division.

Hall wasn't sure how the exam scores would be computed with the pinfall to determine the 28 prizewinners, so he wants to finish first in his division to make sure he doesn't miss out. Scholarships automatically go to the four finalists.

"It's going to take scores of 185 to 190 just to reach the finals," he speculated. "Then you'll have to roll a solid 220 or 230 in the finals to win. This is a very competitive field. I should do 0ell if I keep my rhythm and my temper," he added.

Hall said he sometimes takes out the frustration of missing a spare by kicking the ball return.

Elliot Robertson, a junior at McKinley Tech, has been bowling for four years but carries a 173 average. He failed to make the tournament's open division, averaging only 158 in the state qualifying round.

"I think part of the reason for my low average in the state competition was that I wasn't used to the lanes," said Robertson, a weekend bowling league teammate of Hall's.

"The ball return stretches all the way to the foul line, which makes it difficult to shoot your 6-10 spares. But I should be used to it for this tournament."

Robertson said that he, too has rollnd about 70 to 100 games a week for three months to prepare for AAYBC, but added, "After we qualfied for the tournament we could bowl for free. I'll have to cut down on practice when I have to pay 80 cents a game after this is over."

Robertson apparently has more at stake in this competition than just a college scholarship.

"I definitely want to become a pro bowler. We all do," he said of himself, Hall and Cheryl Brown, another of their "Washington's Finest Bowlers" teammates to qualify for the torunament.

Kim Duggan, a senior at Rising Sun (Md.) High School, said her sights are not yet that far-reaching. "I really need the scholarship because I plan on going to college in Florida next year and the money would help my parents meet the expenses."

Duggan averaged 166 in the state round and will compete in the girls open. She says she will have to shoot 190 consistently to win. The 5-foot-5 right-hander will test her accuracy tonight at 6 p.m.