On the whole, he'd rather be in Piscataway, but Bob McAdoo, moving from Boston to Detroit, allows, "I'm delighted to go to a team that wants me."

McAdoo, three-time king of the NBA scoring hill, joins his fourth pro team in a Celtic-Piston agreement yesterday satisfying Boston's obligation for signing former Detroit forward M. L. Carr this summer. Because McAdoo carries a lifetime 27-point NBA scoring average since coming up from North Carolina's Tar Heels to Buffalo's lamented Braves in 1972, Detroit tosses two first-round 1980 draft picks over to the Celtics -- one of them the choice picked up by Detroit from the Bullets for signing Kevin Porter.

Even during a troubled 1978-79 campaign split between the New York Knicks and Boston, where he never fit in, Big Mac was No. 4 in the scoring race (24.6). While McAdoo said he had hoped to wind up with New Jersey, he decided, "It'll be a pleasure to play alongside a bona fide center like Bob Lanier for the first time."

The deal was sealed without Commissioner Larry O'Brien having to arbitrate, and Boston's new coach, Bill Fitch, says, for one thing, "This puts our payroll back in order." . . .

Word is that when D.C. public schools begin the 1979-80 year Monday, ballyhooed 6-11 Earl Jones -- the Mount Hope, W. Va., All-America with the Washington kin and the yen for the big city -- will start classes at (ta da!) Spingarn, cradle of Baylor and Bing. That's what Jones told the folks back home, and Spingarn Coach John Wood said he'd be tickled to have the big guy play his senior year for him in the Interhigh League -- but will believe it when he sees Earl (and acceptable transcripts of his academic status) . . .

Dave Bristol, taking the San Francisco Giant helm on an interim basis in Cincinnati for axed Joe Altobelli, rubbed his hands and declared, "History repeats itself, doesn't it? Last time I was interim manager (with the Reds), it lasted four years. This time it'll last five."

Bristol said the rancor between players and media covering the Giants, which got so out of hand in Altobelli's last months, "has to be remedied" . . .

Baltimore is back in hockey! Eastern League style, that is, based in Civic Center and to be stocked by NHL's Minnesota North Stars . . .

Gerard Williams, the three-year Redskin cornerback whom Ray Waddy made folks forget at nickel time in RFK Sunday, is back in the league, picked up by the DB-hungry San Francisco 49ers.

RFK Stadium Manager Bob Sigholtz says Plan B for Oct. 7, if Eagles-Redskins can't switch to Philly, calls for 11:30 a.m. kickoff and a half-hour pushback for papal mass that afternoon . . . Dr. J. DeWitt Fox, the Los Angeles neurosurgeon who talked of buying the Redskins for a cut-rate $11 million (ha), was interviewed by WTOP's Bernie Smilowitz and darn if he even knew Jack Kent Cooke owns the club -- thought he only had to deal with the new owner of baseball's Orioles.

The San Diego Padres put Gaylord Perry, who quit the team this week, on waivers but, reports General Manager Bob Fontaine, "He was claimed by two clubs in both leagues, so there is nothing we can do now until the offseason" -- at interleague trade time . . .

The inimitable Pedro (Dracula) Borbon, the Giant (ex-Red) pitcher with the chronically itchy teeth, awaits a decision today by a Cincinnati jury that couldn't decide yesterday about assault charges against him for a May 4 disco brawl in which he allegedly bit an adversary in the chest . . .

Harold Bell is not only back with "Inside Sports Report" on WYCB-1340-AM (7:30 a.m. and 5:05 p.m. daily, 10-12 on Friday nights) but with another Bell extravaganza: Roast/Toast to Johnny Gant (the boxer) Sunday evening, Sept. 16, Hyatt Regency.