Bill Walton, San Diego's $7 million but definitely not bionic basketball man, is off "day-to-day" status as to when his strained foot will permit him to launch his Clipper career. He has regressed to "out indefinitely" -- placed on the injured list for a minimum of five more games, more likely to idle three or four more weeks.

Perhaps, "until sometime in 1980," the closely watching San Diego Tribune had said after the Man Mountain reinjured in practice Sunday the left foot he hurt in a Sept. 28 exhibition. Probably not that long, said owner Irv Levin at a "clear-the-air" press conference last night after Walton flew to Los Angeles for examination by four orthopedic surgeons. They put a cast on the foot but assured, Levin said, the injury is unrelated to the fracture Walton suffered in that foot 1 1/2 years ago with Portland; the cast "stays on until Bill is pain-free . . . we are not going to rush his recovery program."

The 6-11 MVP of NBA '77 had been on the bench, in a civvy suit, through the first six games of the Clipper season; with that big seven-year contract, at least he had to look "family." But he resumed using crutches this week and missed the Clipper Victory over Denver Tuesday night.

Another in the series of rabbit punches to D.C. fight promoter Jim Denson and his constantly changing fall show at the Armory. It's back to square one for a Nov. 24 main event, again, if any: Sean O'Grady, the 20-year-old Oklahoman due to challenge for Ernesto Espana's WBA lightweight title here, not only faild for only about the fourth time in almost 70 fights to knock out his opponent in Oklahoma City Tuesday night -- but in decisioning Arturo Leon, he was cut severely enough around the eyes that he may take as long as two months to heal. End Espano-O'Grandy plans for Washington in November . . .

No wonder we never saw Phillie catcher Bob Boone's name on the re-entry list this week. So much, for all those Boone-to-the-Yanks rumors, the solid backstop (and .286 batter despite nagging injuries last season) signed yesterday for four more years in Quaker City . . . But how about Houston's Jose Cruz? He showed up on the free agent roster after having vowed publicly in June he was an Astro for five years to come. Now Tal Smith, Astro cheif executive, has gone to court and gotten a 10-day temporary restrainer to keep Cruz, the club's top base-hit and RBI man, from negotiating elsewhere; says he has a document signed April 21 that constituted a binding letter of intent by Cruz to sign a five-year extension at agree-upon terms . . .

All of a sudden, Richfield (Ohio) Coliseum is a two-Carr garage. Two from Washington, at that, now that the NBA Cavaliers obtained forward Kenny Carr from L.A. yesterday, for futures; De Martha's Carr joins Cav guard Austin Carr, The Mackin man, and all those other Clevelanders named Smith . . .

Bill Virdon of the Astros is UPI's choice as National League baseball manager of the year, 16 votes to 7 for Montreal's Dick Williams.

Eastern High School's football team evidently will be able to finish the Season after all. To replace the squad's gear, cleaned out by thieves, Howard U. is lending equipment for Friday's game against H. D. Woodson. It may not fit too well, but help is on the way. American Council on International Sports, aware charity begins at home, has kicked in with $100 as starter for a fund it will catalyze to replace Eastern's loss. Chuck Rambo, president of the organization (headquartered at Gwu, invites tax-deductible contributions to the cause, 100 percent to go for EHS uniforms and pads; send checks to ACIS, 817-23rd St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20052.