Jeff Bullis, hustling Georgetown sophomore really getting into the swing of the Hoya game plan lately as a vital reserve at both forward and center, has checked into the university hospital complaining of rapid, uncomfortable heart rate.

No irregularities were found in presseason stress tests administered all GU basketball candidates, but diagnosis after Bullis' hospital admission Sunday night was "an irregular heartbeat," according to Jim Marchiony, GU sports information director. Tests continue.

The 6-foot-7 Bullis from Bel Air, Md., sprained an ankle at practice last Wednesday, did not practice Thursday, worked lightly Friday and played eight minutes in the 71-69 Saturday loss to St. John's. With Coach John Thompson giving the team Sunday off, Bullis visited a relative, watched the Super Bowl, returned to his dorm, called Hoya trainer Doug Huffman and went to the hospital. . . .

The two most recent boxing deaths in the United States -- both occurring Friday as the result of bouts fought Jan. 9-12 -- have been verified via autopsy as caused by brain injuries.

There had been virtually no doubt in the case of Charles Newell, 26, the convict-pro fighter fatally hurt in a Hartford, Conn., ring. Brain stem damage had been certified during neurosurgery.

But what of Harlan Hoosier, 13, of Beauty, Ky., dead five days after winning -- winning! -- three bouts to earn novice "champion of champions" Laurels in a tournament in Lenore, W.Va.

The boy, a 71-pounder, fought without protective headgear, and the Amateur Athletic Union's West Virginia state chairman, Gary Toney, defensively or otherwise, is up in arms. The Lenore tourney was not AAU-sanctioned, but Toney said the West Virginia Boxing Commission did approve it -- and the commission "has always recognized AAU safety rules."

One of those rules is that junior boxers must wear protective headgear, Toney said. A news release Sunday on the upcoming Golden Gloves tournments at three West Virginia sites said, "The wearing of protective helmets will be optional." The Golden Gloves requires entrants to be at least 16 years of age.

In the case of the dead 13-year-old, Toney said, "He had no choice to wear it or not. The boy should have worn the headgear or been disqualified" . . .

Of baseball teams and ball yards, interesting was the big Jan. 12 ad in the Washington papers "Introducing the Orioles 1980 Do-It-Yourself Season Plan." One had to wade through a whole lot of type to discover mention -- just in the "make check payable to" and the mailing address -- the word "Baltimore" . . .

Brooks Robinson, Elrod Hendricks and Scott McGeregor from whatever-that-place-is will be in Fairfax on Sunday, with be in Fairfax on Sunday, with Dick Bosman and Jim Spencer, as guest speakers at the annual Fairfax High School baseball clinic. It runs 9 a.m. to midafternoon; tickets at $3, on sale at the FHS gym from 8 a.m. on. Nothing in advance. . . . Same day, the Northern Virginia Baseball Umpires Association holds its first of the annual series of clinics on the basics. At Vienna Community Center, 120 Cherry St., 5 p.m. . . .

Extra active West Virginia U. alumni chapter here will preface the WVU-American game in Fort Myer gym Wednesday with a 6 p.m. reception, in the fort's officers club. Due on hand is the new Mountaineer football coach, Don Nehlen. Two former Interhigh stars play basketball for WVU: Dunbar's Greg Nance and Springarn's Diego McCoy.