"Die grosse Schau des kleinen Archie" . . . "Basketball-Genie Talley gewandt wie ein Artist" . . . "Talley stellte Saisonrekord auf -- 'U.S. Wurfmaschine' des TV Clausen sammelte in einem Spiel 80 Punkte!"

That's a headline sampling of the West German press and sporting magazines going wild over Archie Talley. The Washingtonian led the pro/semipro basketball world in scoring last year with 55.3 points a game. Well, now that he has learned to cope with the defenses over there --"Notice two defenders trying to guard me! To no avail! I'm killing 'em!" -- he has eclipsed that:

In his first 14 games this season, 827 points. Average age: 59!

In his second campaign with Turn-Verein Clausen of Pirmasens, the 6-foot-1 shatterer of NAIA records at Salem (W.Va.) College has just about doubled the output of his nearest rival in league scoring.

NBA reject Talley toots his horn by mailing clippings but modestly allows that his international publicity is limited because TV Clausen is in the lower echelons of the Bundeslige, the West German league that is broken into first, second, third, etc. divisions a la British soccer.

"They're making a very big deal out of my scoring 80 points in one game (in einem Spiel 80 Punkte)," he writes. "I've scored over 70 about six or seven times this year, and against first-division teams, too." Everything's Archie . . . t

Back on the home front, we find among NCAA Division II scoring leaders Juan Gabourel, following in the tradition of fellow Central High, Seat Pleasant, alum Talley. Gabourel, a 6-3 senior, recently broke the school record for career scoring at Salisbury State, and this week against St. Mary's went over the 2,000 mark . . .

At junior college level, Southeast Community College of Fairbury, Neb., reports that Anacostia's Wilbert Skipper has passed 1,000 points in a 51-game, two-year span and leads the Nebraska Conference (24 average). Zach Jones of Theodore Roosevelt got into the act for San Diego City College two weeks ago; the 6-5 forward posted consecutive games of 47 and 49 points) . . . Southeast is a regular haven for capital-area athletes from the Executive III scholarship program for marginal students directed by Harold Bates. One of those, Ullysses Tucker from Teddy Roosevelt, went from Southeast to U. of Portland and has moved on into the media field -- produces a public service program, "Dialogue," for KPTV-12 as a farum for Oregon's black community, while pursuing postgrad studies. . .

Bowie State's Keith Williams, a brilliant defensive end as a junior last fall and editor-in-chief of The Spectrum, the campus newspapers, is the first recipient of the CIAA Sportswriters Association athlete scholarship award. Already possessor of the Philip L. Graham Scholarship Award from last year, Williams now will take further studies for a future in the media on a $500 grant sponsored by WVEC-TV Hampton, Va. . . .

The University of South Carolina, watching its basketball coach end a 30-year college coaching career today (against Western Kentucky), has proclaimed this Frank McGuire Day and established a Frank McGuire Scholarship. . . t

All-academic basketball teams are due out (Maryland will have a representative on the ACC's), but none can top Catholic U's 6-3 freshman John Rogers. The Wilmington, Del., all-stater scores 3.4 points a game and beats that with a 4.0 grade-point average . . .

Ah, if this weren't Lefty Driesell's born-again-at-Maryland time, this item would rekindle the Texas-size rumors: SMU (russ Potts & Co.) has accepted resignation of Sonny Allen as basketball coach . . .

Another new San Diego Padre face: Gary Nolan, who won a lot of big games for Cincinnati in the early and middle 70s, giving up his job as a card dealer in Las Vegas to try a pitching comeback; optimistic after rotator cuff (shoulder) surgery six months ago.

Billy Martin on being hired by Charlie Finley as Oakland manager: "If he calls on the phone to the dugout, I'll rip the phone out. That's what I did when George Steinbrenner called."

Steinbrenner, on Yankee life without Martin: "It'll never be a smooth sea and I don't want that. I never knew of any sailing ship that got anywhere on a calm sea."