The Atlanta Braves' sorry 1-9 record and Bob Horner's anemic two tingles in 34 at-bats (.059) sent Horner, a .314 33-homer, 98-RBI man last year, packing last night for the Richmond farm.

Hormer came right off the Arizona State campus to become the Braves' starting third baseman in June two years ago and belted his way to 1978 rookie-of-year honors. He has never spent a moment in the minors. He has committed six errors in nine games this season.

Owner Ted Turner's right-hand man, Al Thornwell, Brave executive v.p., had declared yesterday, "We're going to shake the team up . . . make some major changes as fast as possible." Turner had visited the clubhouse after loss No. 9, after which second baseman Jerry Royster summed up the boss's mood: "Panic."

Horner, who last year beefed up his contract in a lenghty arbitration fight, got the impression on that visit, "Ted is just fed up with the way things are going and he's willing to trade anybody. If he trades me there's nothing I can do about it."

Horner has no-trade clause in his contract but can be optioned to the minors three times before he becomes fair game for other clubs.

Next move, Mr. T? . . . .

Baseball's all-star ballots have been unveiled by Commissioner Bowie Kuhn and somehow they've found room for nine games at each position, up from the previous eight. But the existence of the designated hitter is not acknowledged on the American League segment -- and if somebody argues that it's because DHs are not complete players, we'll agree, but since when did fielding count for anything in all-star voting? Regrettably, since never. Anyway -- who will be this year's write-in leaders? . . .

No wonder Sonny Werblin lately declared the services of Earl Monroe no longer required -- the N.Y. Knicks have just added Reggie Carter to their roster of young guards. Carter, St. John's star drafted by New York on the second round in 1979, opted for his senior year of college (and gained all-America mention).

Gerrie Coetzee, fresh from a one-round knockout of Youngstown, Ohio's ranked contender Mike Koranicki in Johannesburg, is reported on the verge of a title fight with Mike Weaver, now that new WBA heavyweight champ Weaver has missed out on Muhammad Ali . . . In solidifying his position as No. 1 middleweight challenger Sunday, Marvin Hagler had a bit of (probably unneeded) help from the timekeeper in disposing with Boogaloo Watts in two rounds. Seems replays show Watts floored with 2:57 gone in the round and the timekeeper failing to sound the bell at three minutes -- it could have saved Watts before the ref declared TKO. . .

Georgetown lands another St. Anthony's basketball star! This time, for the women's team: Diane Toliver, gaining a full grant-in-aid; she scored more than 1,500 points in four years of high school; made all-met in '79.

Jean Fugett put in a good word for Jean Fugett at the union banquet: "A couple of teams still thing I can play. Some don't believe I'm a free agent." To Dick Myers, Redskin assistant g.m., the tight end remarked, "I don't even know if I'm on the (Redskin) roster." Myers replied: "As of April 15 you haven't been. You're on your own." Fugett: "Just hope it's not a team (that signs him) that plays the Redskins twice". . .

Up to five more sports greats will be inducted, probably at the Redskin-Cowboy game Sept. 8, into the Washington Hall of Stars which was inaugurated last Nov. 18 with enshrinement of a nucleus of 20. Their names and faces become part of the RFK Stadium decor.

Bob Addie, a cinch for induction if and when the hall expands to take in sportswriters along with athletic professionals and administrators, heads a selection committee of media folk currently nominating and evaulating candidates . . .

At the Oriole luncheon, TD Club, last week, John Dixon got up in the audience to say it's high time to build a "coliseum" here -- big enough for Olympics, even. Countered Rick Dempsey, the snappy catcher: "Is that your own proposal, or a prediction from your wife?" Jeane Dixon, that is. . .

And what else is new? From The Washington Post of Feb. 5, 1925: "Stadium Site Proposed 13 Miles From Capital -- (Gus) Buchholz Outlines Project to Directors of Chamber of Commerce -- Tract is Near Laurel." The story under those headlines begins, "A movement to build a gigantic stadium large enough for the international Olympics games and the annual Army and Navy football game 13 miles from Washington on the Baltimore-Washington pike, was outlined . . ." Against a gray February sky?