The women's tennis championships coming up in January at Capital Centre not only have a deep-dipping sponsor in Colgate but a "presenter" in First American Banks. Now who will take over the annual Washington-area men's indoor tour event?

Volvo, which sponsored same as part of a 93-city, worldwide circuit, has withdrawn support of the tournament, originally scheduled for George Washington U.'s Smith Center in early March. But, never fear, counsels tournament director Marie Patrick: A sponsor will be named with a few weeks for the $75,000 competition, now slated for Robinson Secondary School's 4,000-seat gym in Fairfax County March 16-22 and still to feature Roscoe Tanner, Manuel Orantes and other heavy hitters in a 32-man draw.

"In no way," Patrick says, does Volvo's vamoose mean "a negative response . . . It was a smart and positive decision. Washington is a hotbed of tennis enthusiasts and is very attractive to potential sponsors. The event will be played and will still be a major fund-raiser for the Washington Tennis Patrons Foundation" . . .

In the 1930s, when Jesse Owens was making his mark, so was another Cleveland athlete -- the Jesse Owens of women's track, Stella Walsh. And now, at 69, she follows him in death, shot in a Cleveland discount store's parking lot, apparently a robbery victim.

She was born Stanislawa Walasiewicz in Poland, immigrated with her family as an infant; at 17, she was selected for the 1928 U.S. Olympic team but was disqualified when her foreign origin was discovered and she had not applied for citizenship. She went on to win seven gold or silver medals as a sprinter and long jumper in the 1932 and 1936 Olympics -- representing Poland. Naturalized in 1947, she won three AAU championships at age 37 and the AAU long jump at 40. She lived in a Polish-American neighborhood to the end; directed several Polish social clubs and was helping with publicity on the Polish national women's basketball team visit to Kent State next week.

Dan Pastorini, the Oakland Raider quarterback renowned for life in the fast lane had a small vial of cocaine on him, Santa Clara County (Calif.) sheriff's officers say, when they routinely patted him down after his car -- license MR P -- was stopped and he was arrested for failure to pay about $80 in fines for past traffic violations. It happened Thanksgiving; authorities say he likely will not face drug charges because the search probably was improper and would not stand up in court, and they saw no reason to make his arrest public. Pastorini has not played since breaking a leg early this season . . .

In Pastorini's old stomping grounds, Houston, the knockout triumph over Pittsburgh is tempered by loss of all-pro offensive tackle Leon Gray with a ruptured Achilles' tendon. But Angelo (Grizzly) Fields, 330-pound rookie out of the D.C. Interhigh League (and Michigan State), stepped in so effectively after Gray was hurt in the second quarter that the Oilers presented him the game ball. "It was my greatest moment," said Fields.

Dick MacPherson, Cleveland Brown linebacker coach, was unveiled as Syracuse U. football coach between games of the basketball Carrier Classic last night. Yep, MacPherson's the one E.B. Williams reportedly wanted for alma mater Holy Cross . . . NCAA says South Carolina Coach Jim Carlen and Heisman George Rogers are clean, no rules violations found in Carlen's screening, or whatever, of parties interested in a piece of Rogers' future . . . Every college coach with a modicum of success is mentioned as of interest to Auburn, George Welsh and Dick Bestwick among 'em, but it's not certain whether it's an actual contact list or just a "wish" list of the search committee . . .

One more irregularity in Leonard-Duran II: nobody bothered to collect the requisite postfight urine samples from the boxers . . . Tonight at Joe Louis Arena in Detroit, Sugar-stalking Tommy Hearns defends his WBA welterweight title against likely 30th straight victim Luis Primera of Venezuela . . .

Sunday in RFK Stadium: 39th anniversary of the Redskins-Eagles game from which military brass were summoned from the stands because Pearl Harbor had been attacked.