"Those (Ram players) who don't like Rams management, we'll try to deal them elsewhere," says the general manager of the Los Angeles team dethroned after six straight NFC West titles and then quickly ousted from the playoffs.

Don Klosterman pointedly went public yesterday to pass on that tidbit -- perking up the ears of such as old Ramskin Jack Pardee, California-bred Bobby Beathard and ex-Angeleno J.K. Cooke?

Let's see. Eight players aired contract grievances during the L.A. season: Jack Youngblood, Larry Brooks, Dennis Harrah, Jim Youngblood, Pat Thomas, Jack Reynolds, Bob Brudzinski, who split at midseason, and Vince Ferragamo.

Ferragamo, who played out his option at $52,000, calling a raise to $250,000 not enough, is one story. "We certainly want him. We'd never let him go unless there's no possible way we thought we could satisfy him," Klosterman says.

And the others, most of them Pro Bowl caliber? "I don't like that we-win-for-ourselves, not-Ram-management stuff" he heard from several, says Klosterman.

"We hope to get these contract problems resolved as quickly as possible . . . (but) if Ram management is bothersome to the mental well-being of these players, we'll, try to accommodate them and send them someplace else". . .

It's no place else, right now, anyway, not Green Bay, for Gil Brandt, player personnel director of the same Cowboys who rode the Rams out of contention. Addressing speculation, Brandt says, "No, I don't believe I'm going to be a candidate for the Packers' general manager job." That's the one stripped from Coach Bart Starr. . .

Death in Georgetown University Hospital, cancer: Aaron Perry, just a few weeks since his induction in to the Washington Boxing Hall of Fame. As a welter-weight in the mid-1940s, in matches here with ex-champs he outpointed Fritzie Zivic, lost two decisions to Sammy Angott and a kayo to Henry Armstrong. . .

When even the people you write about like your work, that's some sportswriting, and the Association of Tennis Professionals has bestowed its distinguished service award for 1980 on The Post's man about tennis, Barry Lorge.