The dog days, already. Terry Bradshaw was chasing his pooch, down home in Grand Cane, La., when he ran into a wall and owoooch! The rededicated Pittsburgh quarterback broke the big toe on his left foot. He's sent the Steelers word that the injury likely will keep him from running for about three weeks but he should be able to practice when the Steeler veterans assemble July 16. . .

If there's wincing in Pittsburgh, there's flinching in Philadelphia, but no stubbing of any toe for Don Meredith, the ol' cowhand who preceded Bradshaw into the quarterback/acting ranks. The baseball strike has caused a syndicate of potential buyers to withdraw from the bidding for the Phillies; a group led by Philly realty developer Herb Barness and paper manufacturer Ben Alexander (he owns indoor soccer's Fever) -- and including Dandy Don. "Yes, we're dropouts," said Alexander. "The strike really turned us off."

Franchise owner Ruly Carpenter, sufficiently turned off even before the stoppage, remains bent on selling his world champions and plans to hear out up to a half-dozen "heavyweight" bids next week. The winner might pay $30 million or so, plus picking up obligations such as Steve Carlton's newly announced upgraded contract -- which Carpenter puts in, "I wouldn't consider a financial burden, would you? I felt morally compelled to do this, when I realized that there were a bunch of pitchers who couldn't carry Lefty's socks who were making twice as much as he did". . . .

Arranged this spring, but not advertised by the closemouthed three-time Cy Young winner, it is a four-year deal -- counting whatever of 1981 there may be to count. It lifts Carlton from $400,000 annual pay, under his now phased-out 1979-83 contract, to $700,000-$750,000 a year through 1984. The Phils have the option to decide late in '83 if they want to retain him for '84, when he will be 39 years old. . .

Drowned, in a Little Rock city reservoir: Bruce Jenkins, 19, U. of Arkansas varsity golfer who won the Arkansas Public Links last week and would have competed in the National Publinx next week in Houston. Authorities said he, his brother and a friend climbed a fence for a midnight dip. . . In Taipei, a statue of Jenny Lotz will be erected in honor of the world-ranked diver fatally injured in a practice backward flip at a pool in Taiwan. A Buddhist memorial service was held in Taipei yesterday to thank Lotz, 23, for her "posthumous good deeds" -- her parents donated her kidneys for transplant Saturday, a day after her death. . .

Too late: The Touchdown Club's Red Auerbach luncheon testimonial today is a sellout. . .

Old Dominion University, which recently stepped to the fore in switching from AIAW to NCAA as a more promising venue for women's varsity basketball, follows up by becoming host to the final four of the first NCAA Division I women's championship, in Norfolk's Scope March 26 and 28. Thirty-two teams will play first-round games March 12-14, then head to neutral sites for regionals March 18-21. Nora Lynn Finch, North Carolina State assistant a.d. who chairs the NCAA women's basketball committee, noted that the tournament dates "will be going head to head with the AIAW tournament and possibly even head to head on national television coverage. A great many schools will be watching to possibly decide which road to follow in 1982-83". . . But the postgraduate roads narrow. Scratch another Women's Basketball League team, the Minnesota Fillies. Maybe they'll move to Detroit or Milwaukee, says the pro franchise's owner in tossing in the Twin Cities towel. . .

Luis Tiant, studiously left at Portland by the parent Pittsburgh Pirates when they called up Pascual Perez, Ernie Camacho et al. from the Beavers to bolster a sore-armed staff, boasts a 7-4 record, 3.48 ERA at Pacific Coast League season midpoint, a nice regular paycheck -- and, still, a burning desire to get back to the majors. The strike? "I don't want to say anything. I want to come back."