Elsewhere in the NFL's 1-5 nether regions:

Baltimore Coach Mike McCormack says after the fifth Colt loss in a row: "No, I don't think it's the coaching (that's to blame) . . . our coaches can't take the players by the hand during the game."

Former Baltimore Coach Ted Marchibroda has new "help" as Chicago Bear offensive coordinator. Papa Bear George Halas has hired Jim Dooley as Marchibroda's "consultant."

"I've never seen such miserable offense in my life," said owner Halas, whose life goes back 86 years, as he saw in Sunday's loss to the Redskins and other recent reversals. "But one thing I promise, next year we'll have a different team. There'll be a lot of changes in mental attitude."

Meantime, there's the rest of this year, and Coach Neill Armstrong, who always has hired his own assistants, said he supported Halas' move with Dooley. "Ted Marchibroda still has the same job," Armstrong emphasized. "We're just adding another coach" in Dooley, who suffered through a 1-13 downer in 1969, second year of a four-year stretch as Bear head coach, and has been out of pro football since.

Halas, just finished speaking to his players for the second time in three weeks after going years without meeting the squad as a whole, said Armstrong and General Manager Jim Finks are safe for now, but "we'll see how it goes."

And in Baltimore, McCormack said owner Bob Irsay gave him no cause to fear for his job: "He told me (last midweek) to keep my (chin) up . . ."

The Indianapolis Motor Speedway has announced a revised first prize of $299,124 for Indy 500 winner Bobby Unser, but said the money would not be paid for at least 30 days. That's to allow possible appeal by Mario Andretti of last week's decision returning Andretti's victory-by-delayed-penalty to first finisher Unser . . . Now that Niki Lauda has decided to return to Formula 1 racing, Britain's former world driving champions Jackie Stewart and James Hunt have multimillion-dollar offers to do likewise. And Stewart, retired since 1973, is saying, "If all three of us came back it would be the greatest thing on earth for motor racing and the offer I have had is very difficult to turn down." He'll make up his mind within two weeks . . .

Army and Navy graciously switched starting times of their football classic in recent years, shivering in the twilight to accommodate TV, and now the academies go an extra step for exposure and ABC's sake. Next Monday, the 1981 renewal in Philadelphia will be changed from Saturday, Nov. 28, to either the Thursday or Friday before or to Dec. 5 to help relieve the network's "mammoth scheduling logjam for that weekend" . . . Navy's Marco Pagnanelli is ECAC Division I-A rookie of week for his versatile quarterbacking against Air Force. Fullback Chris Butler is Eastern Lightweight Football League player of the week for carrying the Navy 150-pounders past Army, 17-7 . . . And we never did get to pass along that linebacker Andy Bushak, erstwhile Midshipman, tried this summer, as a service vet of 27, to break into the NFL in hometown Cleveland only to wind up on Browns' injured reserve; tore up a knee in a scrimmage with the Bills . . .

Greg Luzinski, after thinking reentry draft, has opted to stay in good old Chicago. The White Sox retain their big DH with a package that includes about $700,000 guaranteed each of the next three years plus a fourth year as yet not guaranteed . . . Oh-oh. Wayne Candies Inc. of Fort Wayne, Ind., is closing operations Friday. The end of its Reggie! bar? . . .

Where are they now? Brian Magid, the Maryland and GW basketballer, arches jump shots for Hapoel-Haifa as a pro in Israel. He left public affairs at the Civil Aeronautics Board for the seven-month season over there . . . And Marylander Vince Paterno, watching Columbus Channel 10 on a recent trip through Ohio, did a double take at the weekend sportscaster: Stu Klitenic, Northwood High basketball all-Met who went on to considerable varsity service at South Carolina . . .

More NFL blues: Browns' Art Modell so upset over officiating in the loss at Pittsburgh he stomped down, postgame, from his loge box to bang on the door of the officials' quarters until he was admitted. "It's the first time in 21 years (as Cleveland owner) I've ever done something like that, but I'm not sorry. I told (referee) Ben Dreith that I think his crew choked up. If it costs me $5,000 (commissioner's automatic fine for openly criticizing officiating), that breaks down to about $1,000 for each choke . . . It might be worth $10,000."