Pedro Guerrero, World Series hero, is not worth Ozzie Smith, shortstop, even up, the San Diego Padres have informed the Los Angeles Dodgers.

"The Dodgers came to us," says Padre General Manager Jack McKeon, contradicting Dodger President Peter O'Malley's weekend communique that the trade talk originated the other way around. "Guerrero is an outstanding player and has the kind of right-hand power we're looking for, but we would have to get much more in return for Ozzie". . .

A footnote on Guerrero: a day after he returned in triumph to a warm Santo Domingo welcome, he found himself threatened and abused by two Dominican compatriots because his car bumped theirs. Police intervened . . .

Larry Wright, one of the champion Bullets, is out of NBA work. Detroit waived the former D.C. Interhigh star (Western) to pick up Glenn Hagan, minor league (Rochester Zenith) flash dropped by Boston on season's eve, to back up sensational rookie Isiah Thomas in Piston back court . . . Cable-gram: Terry Hanson, who left here after 1978 as Diplomats' assistant g.m. to general-manage NASL's Atlanta Chiefs, rises from the ashes of that soccer franchise to become executive producer of sports for Atlanta SuperStation WTBS . . . NCAA-on-ABC football doubleheader Saturday: Clemson-North Carolina (regional) followed by Georgia-Florida (national) . . .

National League baseball manager of the year, says UPI, with 21 votes from its 30-writer panel: Whitey Herzog, whose Cardinals were the "real" NL East champs. Manager Herzog can thank General Manager Herzog for furnishing him the likes of Bruce Sutter -- never mind that he shipped out that other fireman of the year, Rollie Fingers . . . Back with the Mets: Bud Harrelson. The ex-shortstop thought, when the call came, they wanted him for their revamped broadcasting team, but no. He'll be first base coach and fundamentals tutor . . . The Braves have fired the colorful manager of their Carolina League team in Durham. "We wanted someone who'd be more patient with our young talent," Atlanta's farm director, Hank Aaron, explained in dismissing Dirty Al Gallagher, ex-Giant/Angel third baseman listed in the Baseball Encyclopedia as "Gallagher, Alan Mitchell Edward George (Dirty Al), also known as Patrick Henry Gallagher". . .

Thumbless boxing gloves (the "Everlast Eyesaver") have been developed, and will be mandatory in New York state fights as of Jan. 15 (and as goes New York, so often goes much of the ring world). "A momentous occasion in boxing history . . . We expect the elimination of 85 percent of eye injuries," says Jack Prenderville, chairman, N.Y. State Athletic Commission. The commission's Floyd Patterson headed the study group that approved the mitt, in which the thumb fits into a padded section inside the glove, which is stuffed with a new type of foam.

Said former heavyweight champ Patterson: "The thumbless glove has the impact of a 10-ounce glove even though it weighs eight ounces. Most people think brain damage is the big problem in boxing but . . . it is the detached retinas. Four of us Pattersons went into boxing. Two, my older brother and the youngest, came out of it with detached retinas. It also eliminates holding. There is no way that a boxer can hold with this. His thumb is immobilized."

Prenderville adds the new glove reduces the "intensity" of a punch -- "on the jab as much as 50 percent and on a full shot to the jaw, approximately 25 percent. This will make boxing a game of skill, not mayhem". . .

Jeff Rutledge, just asserting himself in the L.A. Ram quarterback derby Sunday by relief-pitching the comeback that beat Detroit, is out the rest of the regular season following surgery on his dislocated right thumb. Dan Pastorini's turn to contest Pat Haden for regular work . . . And on whose Lion helmet did Rutledge bang his throwing hand? Onrushing William Gay, who -- look out, J.T. -- just seems to be bad news for passers this fall even when cleanly going about his profession; his hits, remember, dry-docked Tommy Kramer and Lynn Dickey . . .

And Dennis Thurman of the Dallas secondary reckons he could be a marked man come Cowboys-Eagles rematch Dec. 13. Thurman knocked Philadelphia's Harold Carmichael out of commission last year to end his 127-game reception streak; then Sunday in the Vet, blitzing cornerback Thurman was penalized for spearing Ron Jaworski after the quarterback released a fourth-quarter pass, ending his day's work with sore ribs and bruised left arm. Thurman also knocked Wilbert Montgomery down on a sideline tackle the Eagles thought was late. There was no call.

"I don't know if the hit he put on me was late . . . I don't worry about the hits, they're part of the game," said Jaworski, who expects to play against St. Louis this week. "The play on Wilbert was an obvious foul."

Thurman: "They'll probably try to get me on the specialty teams. If they want to pull a guard and have him come after me, fine . . . (but) I'm not a dirty player. Everybody knows that . . ."Pat (Lightfoot) Jefferson, junior welterweight headliner (versus Hillcrest Height's Mike James) as boxing returns to D.C. Armory 8 p.m. Thursday, says his 6-0 pro record was prefaced by a 249-24 amateur career featuring 1976 losses ("split decision") to Howard Davis and ("close decision") to Tommy Hearns.

A. Gerry Cooney next fights comebacker Joe Bugner (replacing Animal Lopez) Dec. 5, Las Vegas . . . Q. Stealing home, cont'd: last in World Series to do so on the pitcher (Billy Martin tried and failed, same game) was Jackie Robinson, Game 1, 1955. Title of the Broadway musical opening Nov. 12 about Robinson?