Q: What does Jerry Sloan have in common with Joey Amalfitano, Neill Armstrong and Keith Magnuson? A: Ex-coach (or manager) of a Chicago pro sports team.

The NBA Bulls made it a foursome fired within a four-month span by dismissing Sloan yesterday. His worthies had lost nine of 10 games, dipped to 19-32 for the season and made their 45-37 mark (plus first-round playoff advancement) of last season ancient history. So, Sloan got the word from G.M. Rod Thorn: After Phil Johnson, Sloan's assistant, coached the Bulls last night against the New Jersey Nets, Thorn, who once coached the ABA New York Nets, will do so the rest of Chi's season. After that? Maybe Bobby Leonard.

Sloan gained a three-year extension for last year's second-year work, but that didn't stand up in the face of reported team dissension, including a supposed Sloan-Artis Gilmore rift, and those losses . . .

Cleveland checks in with its own version of a clean sweep. Ted Stepien just beat NBA trading deadline by wheeling away the last players on the Cavalier roster he bought two years ago. He followed up on sending Reggie Johnson to Kansas City for Cliff Robinson--Kings' scoring and rebounding leader who will be looking for around $700,000 a year to replace his expiring, $155,000-area contract--by unloading Kenny Carr and 6-11 Bill Laimbeer to Detroit. Carr, ex-De Matha, takes a 15.1 scoring average to the Pistons, who send the Cavs forward Phil Hubbard, 7-footer Paul Mokeski--and, by golly, replenish Stepien's shriveled draft supply with a 1982 No. 1 (the one Detroit got from the Bullets for Kevin Porter) and a No. 2 . . .

Nestor Chylak, one of the great names in umpiring, has died at 59; evidently a heart attack in his sleep at home, 502 N. Apple St., Dunmore, Pa. A quarter century he called 'em in the American League; since 1979 was assistant supervisor of AL umps. He was so good he seldom drew the customary catcalls about blind umpires--yet, would you believe Chylak almost lost his eyesight in WW II's Battle of the Bulge? Hit by shrapnel from a German shell; doctors didn't know until they removed his bandages 10 days later whether he would be able to see . . . Among the bereaved, forlornly waiting on the Newfoundland shore for certain word about the oil rig victims: Scotty Morrison, NHL vice president/officiating, whose son Perry was one of the 84.

More bad tidings: Robert E. Short, 64, Washington's last baseball owner until moving the team to Texas, undergoing chemotherapy in Minneapolis for inoperable lung cancer. Short, a major figure in Minnesota business and politics, is an outpatient . . .

One more of the Super Steelers retires, but they'll hardly miss him: Jon Kolb, after 13 years on the offensive line, will stay on as Pittsburgh's strength and conditioning coach. One of pro football's first weightlifting fanatics, Kolb could bench-press 550 pounds and won an NFL strongman competition in 1980 . . . Reminds us, we never did get official certification--until now--of "diminutive but stocky" Dave Riley as Redskins' new strength coach. A New Hampshireman (Keene State '72), Riley coached body building at U.S. Military Academy four years before doing it the past five years for Penn State football. And he's written three books on the subject--the last, "Strength Training for Women." Hmmm . . .

Physicians will check Michael Britt, UDC's can't-miss basketball forward (shooting about 75 percent this month), today to see if he can tolerate a face mask and play this weekend's Lincoln and Fairmont State dates despite his newly broken nose . . . Paul Mulvey, ex-Cap hockey wing banished by Los Angeles to New Haven for pacifism: the AHL club used him only two games, never dressed him the next five. "Just giving him a little time to get himself organized," said a New Haven source. Especially with the team on a winning streak (until last night) . . . Ulf Nilsson, Ranger star, goes AHL to test the right knee that's sidelined him since Sept. 7, Friday for Springfield versus Hershey . . .

Another big-league ballpark dimension change: Padres, who hit nine home runs at home in '81, putting 8 1/2-foot fences several feet inside the forbidding 17-foot wall; center field reduced from 420 feet to 405 . . . Harmon Killebrew's son Ken has waived preliminary hearing on Boise bank holdup charges; trial date pending . . . Three U. of Kansas varsity footballers--two of them 1981 starting linemen (Renwick Atkins, Broderick Thompson)--are charged with burglary, felony theft, $6,000 worth of goods at a dorm and an off-campus residence . . .

A. As cited in a new book, "Baseball's Greatest Quotes" compiled by Kevin Nelson, when a reporter asked Yogi Berra how he'd liked school, he answered, "Closed" . . .

Q What former U. of Cincinnati basketball star's son recently scored 26 points to beat the Bearcats, 52-50?