The Thomas Hearns-Marvin Hagler fight: delayed indefinitely. And so, by extension, Sugar Ray Leonard versus the winner?

The doctors in Detroit said yesterday it would be three to 10 days before Hearns could resume sparring for the bout in Windsor. So, in New York, Bob Arum took promoter's license to make it three times 10, saying, "Thomas was examined by three physicians in Detroit today and they all agreed that he cannot resume sparring for at least 30 days." And to call off the show until who knows when.

Hearns' doctor termed the injury to pinky of right hand a severe sprain, "where it's almost impossible for him to make a fist." Hagler's doctor examined it and ventured, "with proper padding, the man can train and can fight on the 24th."

Hagler's camp reckoned there was a shadow bigger than a man's hand behind the postponement--and, sure enough, came word from Los Angeles that a federal judge had granted Home Box Office a preliminary injunction to prevent Arum and SelecTV, copromoters, from diluting its live broadcast rights. "When they decide who has the authority to run the fight on TV," said Goody Petronelli, a Hagler handler, "maybe we'll go somewhere."

Now hear Hearns declare he won't fight unless physically prepared, regardless of pressure from Hagler's camp: "I'm the one that's hurting, not them . . . I think all they are looking for is the money. I'm looking out for my health" . . .

Arguments all reargued, Los Angeles jury gets the NFL trial today and Oakland waits with bated, etc.

Busy Martina Navratilova has replaced spot player Chris Evert Lloyd as No. 1 in Women's Tennis Association rankings; Navvy's first stint up top since June 1980 . . . National Right to Work Committee's No. 1 football hero: Charger Dan Fouts, for his refusal to pay dues to the NFL Players Association. Rugged individualist Mike Curtis will accept NRWC's Everett M. Dirksen Award for Fouts at the anti-compulsory-unionism outfit's Friday night banquet here . . . Philly Eagle signee: Ken Jenkins, former Landon athlete who led Division I-AA in 1980 in all-purpose yardage; as a free agent out of Bucknell . . .

UDC's Division II national basketball champions drew praise at Touchdown Club/Pigskin Club joint luncheon yesterday, from Mayor Marion Barry, Judge Luke Moore (reading Del. Walter Fauntroy's paean to Firebirds in the Congressional Record), from Coach Wil Jones as a "magnificent 11--and they did it within the system"--and from, yes, George Allen via wire: "Don't rest on your laurels. Win it again" . . . American U. awards banquet, conversation piece (along with success of AU alum Wil Jones): April 30 golf rematch, 51 years to the day at the same course, East Potomac Park, between 1931 city championship winner Burke Edwards and runner-up Brooke Bright. Both represented AU when Bright shot 82, Edwards 83; as half-century alumni, Edwards turned the tables, 88-96. AU cited baseball pitcher Chris Adomanis and basketball center Rhea Farberman as its outstanding athletes . . .

In his first fight since being dispatched by Leonard in Reno, Bruce Finch bade farewell this week to his NABF welterweight title; stopped in four by Donald Curry (12-0, 11 KOs) . . . For fighting during Black Hawks playoff in Chicago Stadium, four fans draw a year's probation, $30 costs--and a year's ban from attending hockey games . . .

At Seminary Lanes, Alexandria, 6:30 Friday, and free, bowling fans: Six Japanese stars en route to ABC Masters in Baltimore contest six of capital area's best league rollers: Larry O'Neill (219 average), Jim Robinette (219), Steve Sipe (213), John Sudduth (212), juniors Richie Wolfe (196), James Norris (180).

Basketball rules are made to be changed. Ed Steitz, NCAA rules committee editor, is "ecstatic" that Big Ten is adopting the three-point, long-range goal for 1982-83. Steitz will do "everything in my power" to get NCAA governing board to approve "what I consider to be the home run of basketball," and is sure it will, since it "has been a smash in the Southern Conference." Iowa Coach Lute Olson recommends 21-foot arc (top-of-key distance), says it will unpack tight zones, give the little man a bigger role . . .

A. Major league records by Toby Harrah: fewest chances, third baseman, complete doubleheader: none, June 25, 1976. Longest game, no assists by 3B: 17 innings, Sept. 17, 1977 . . . Q. Gaylord Perry's predecessors as winners of 300 games, 20th century only?