The University of Oklahoma has put its home game against Southern California Saturday up for television grabs, inviting bids by "any company capable of producing and feeding a live telecast to any and all parts of the country."

Oklahoma thus wasted no time following up on Federal Judge Juan Burciaga's ruling last week that the NCAA's television contracts and ban on outside deals violated antitrust law. The announcement by J.R. Morris, OU's acting president, contained a disclaimer that the contract for Saturday would be voided if Burciaga's ruling is stayed or overturned by the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, to which the NCAA has taken the case.

Morris set a deadline of noon today for offers so a decision can be made by 5 p.m. . . .

Meanwhile, attorneys for the NCAA worked on a request for a stay of the ruling. A spokesman said the request would be filed today in the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver.

The NCAA has put Georgia, Oklahoma's partner in the TV suit against it, on one-year football probation--but the sanctions, for a recruiting violation, do not include restriction from television or bowl-game appearances. They do include loss of three grants-in-aid for 1983-84 academic year. The case involved recruitment of a high school player; eventually, Georgia released him from a national letter of intent and he is now a Texas A&M freshman . . .

In Evansville, Indiana University Coach Lee Corso was charged with "acting like a clown and a maniac on the sideline" by a special assistant to the school's president, who later called his remarks unfortunate. George Taliaferro, a two-time All-America at IU, criticised Corso in a speech before the Evansville Downtown Quarterback Club. Eight hours later, realizing he had created a furor and his comments were taped, Taliaferro said by phone that his speech was "very unfortunate" and that he needed to apologize to Corso.

Taliaferro was on the committee that was instrumental in recommending Corso for the IU post. "I confess I thought I had done an excellent job," Taliaferro said. "I made the mistake of talking to people at Louisville and getting a rosy picture. They were trying to get rid of him."

Kentucky Coach Jerry Claiborne suspended Pete Venable, his leading rusher in the Kansas State opener, for the season for violating an 11 p.m. curfew, according to Venable's replacement in the backfield as of last weekend's Oklahoma game, John Gay. "As far as I know, it was (Venable's) first time," Gay said. "No, I don't think he should have been kicked off the team. Not the first time . . .

Virginia Coach George Welsh assembled his 0-2 Cavaliers Sunday night to tell them the loss to James Madison was no different from any other loss, and "you'd better forget about it; nothing positive comes out of any loss." Still, it was "the longest team meeting I've ever had" (25 minutes).