It does not pay to tug on Superman's cape. Or on Ralph Sampson's jersey.

Duke learned that lesson the hard way tonight, angering Sampson and his Virginia teammates enough in the first half that the second-ranked Cavaliers humiliated the Blue Devils the last 20 minutes en route to a record-setting 109-66 victory in the opening round of the ACC tournament.

Earlier, fifth-ranked North Carolina eased past Clemson, 105-79, and N.C. State edged Wake Forest, 71-70, on a free throw by Lorenzo Charles with three seconds to play. Carolina (26-6) will meet State (18-10) in Saturday's first semifinal at 1:30 p.m. and Virginia (26-3) will play Georgia Tech in the second semifinal at 3:30. Both games will be televised on WJLA-7.

Virginia's victory margin was the largest in the 30-year history of the tournament, surpassing Wake Forest's 80-41 victory over Maryland in 1963. The loss was also the worst in Duke's history.

The major problems for the Cavaliers in the first half centered around Sampson, who threw an elbow at Duke's Jay Bilas 11 seconds into the game. Sampson got his second foul after 24 seconds and his third with 12:28 to go.

Buoyed by Sampson's absence, the Blue Devils (11-17) hung in. The game was tied at 35 with 5:27 left, before Virginia's pressure defense began to get to Duke and the Cavaliers took a 50-41 lead at the half.

"We had an opportunity then, but our 11 turnovers and their 11 offensive boards kept us from getting the lead we needed," said Duke Coach Mike Krzyzewski. "The second half was just ridiculous. We're very embarrassed."

Krzyzewski was embarrassed, Sampson angry. He accused Bilas of "dirty play," which he said caused his foul problems. "That kind of stuff has no place in the ACC tournament." Asked what he was referring to, Sampson said, "I know what he did, he knows what he did, that's all."

Bilas said he did nothing that could be connoted as dirty and Krzyzewski was angry at Sampson's comments. "To talk about dirty play after a 43-point win is ridiculous, it's really bad," he said. "Our kids play hard. They don't play dirty."

Even though Sampson got his fourth foul quickly in the second half, it didn't matter. Othell Wilson, who led his team with 23 points, and Craig Robinson, who had 19, more than picked up the slack, as did Virginia's bench. Even in his limited time, Sampson had 18 points. The Cavaliers scored the first 11 points of the second half and at one point had outscored Duke, 48-18, in the half.

The opening game of the tournament was a different kind of rout. Clemson (11-20) stayed close to North Carolina most of the game, trailing, 74-65, with 6:25 left. Then Michael Jordan and Matt Doherty, who each had 28 points, and Jim Braddock, who had 18, buried the Tigers under a barrage of three-point baskets.

Carolina won easily despite the absence of center Sam Perkins, who sat out the game with what Coach Dean Smith called "24-hour toe," a foot injury incurred last week against Duke. Perkins probably could have played today and is likely to play against State.

The reason the Tar Heels will face the Wolfpack and not Wake Forest is Sidney Lowe. Although Thurl Bailey's 25 points kept State in the game most of the way, it was Lowe's heady play in the final minute that was the difference.

With the game tied at 70 and 4:25 left, Wake Coach Carl Tacy spread his offense and the Deacons easily ran the clock to 30 seconds before calling time.

Valvano then ordered his team to play its "22-trap" defense, doubling on the ball. "I wanted to try to make something happen," he said. "If we sat back, they get one shot, it goes in, the game's over."

Wake never got a shot. Alvis Rogers, double-teamed in the corner, looped a weak lob pass toward point guard Danny Young at midcourt. Lowe, breaking from his man, tipped the ball to Bailey and State called time with 10 seconds left. Angry Sampson, Va. Rout Duke By John Feinstein Washington Post Staff Writer

ATLANTA, March 11--It does not pay to tug on Superman's cape. Or on Ralph Sampson's jersey.

Duke learned that lesson the hard way tonight, angering Sampson and his Virginia teammates enough in the first half that the second-ranked Cavaliers humiliated the Blue Devils the last 20 minutes en route to a record-setting 109-66 victory in the opening round of the ACC tournament.

Earlier, fifth-ranked North Carolina eased past Clemson, 105-79, and N.C. State edged Wake Forest, 71-70, on a free throw by Lorenzo Charles with three seconds to play. Carolina (26-6) will meet State (18-10) in Saturday's first semifinal at 1:30 p.m. and Virginia (26-3) will play Georgia Tech in the second semifinal at 3:30. Both games will be televised on WJLA-7.

Virginia's victory margin was the largest in the 30-year history of the tournament, surpassing Wake Forest's 80-41 victory over Maryland in 1963. The loss was also the worst in Duke's history.

The major problems for the Cavaliers in the first half centered around Sampson, who threw an elbow at Duke's Jay Bilas 11 seconds into the game. Sampson got his second foul after 24 seconds and his third with 12:28 to go.

Buoyed by Sampson's absence, the Blue Devils (11-17) hung in. The game was tied at 35 with 5:27 left, before Virginia's pressure defense began to get to Duke and the Cavaliers took a 50-41 lead at the half.

"We had an opportunity then, but our 11 turnovers and their 11 offensive boards kept us from getting the lead we needed," said Duke Coach Mike Krzyzewski. "The second half was just ridiculous. We're very embarrassed."

Krzyzewski was embarrassed, Sampson angry. He accused Bilas of "dirty play," which he said caused his foul problems. "That kind of stuff has no place in the ACC tournament." Asked what he was referring to, Sampson said, "I know what he did, he knows what he did, that's all."

Bilas said he did nothing that could be connoted as dirty and Krzyzewski was angry at Sampson's comments. "To talk about dirty play after a 43-point win is ridiculous, it's really bad," he said. "Our kids play hard. They don't play dirty."

Even though Sampson got his fourth foul quickly in the second half, it didn't matter. Othell Wilson, who led his team with 23 points, and Craig Robinson, who had 19, more than picked up the slack, as did Virginia's bench. Even in his limited time, Sampson had 18 points. The Cavaliers scored the first 11 points of the second half and at one point had outscored Duke, 48-18, in the half.

The opening game of the tournament was a different kind of rout. Clemson (11-20) stayed close to North Carolina most of the game, trailing, 74-65, with 6:25 left. Then Michael Jordan and Matt Doherty, who each had 28 points, and Jim Braddock, who had 18, buried the Tigers under a barrage of three-point baskets.

Carolina won easily despite the absence of center Sam Perkins, who sat out the game with what Coach Dean Smith called "24-hour toe," a foot injury incurred last week against Duke. Perkins probably could have played today and is likely to play against State.

The reason the Tar Heels will face the Wolfpack and not Wake Forest is Sidney Lowe. Although Thurl Bailey's 25 points kept State in the game most of the way, it was Lowe's heady play in the final minute that was the difference.

With the game tied at 70 and 4:25 left, Wake Coach Carl Tacy spread his offense and the Deacons easily ran the clock to 30 seconds before calling time.

Valvano then ordered his team to play its "22-trap" defense, doubling on the ball. "I wanted to try to make something happen," he said. "If we sat back, they get one shot, it goes in, the game's over."

Wake never got a shot. Alvis Rogers, double-teamed in the corner, looped a weak lob pass toward point guard Danny Young at midcourt. Lowe, breaking from his man, tipped the ball to Bailey and State called time with 10 seconds left. Valvano did the smart thing: he put the ball in Lowe's hands. Lowe drove the lane and when Rogers jumped out to stop him, he passed to Charles, who was fouled by Rogers.

Charles, after a timeout by Wake, missed badly on his first foul shot but swished the second. Valvano did the smart thing: he put the ball in Lowe's hands. Lowe drove the lane and when Rogers jumped out to stop him, he passed to Charles, who was fouled by Rogers.

Charles, after a timeout by Wake, missed badly on his first foul shot but swished the second.