John Elway, who is being wooed by both the NFL and the New York Yankees, visited Yankee Stadium yesterday and said he will decide between the two sports immediately after the April 26 National Football League draft.

The former Stanford all-America quarterback, who played the outfield for the Yankees' Oneonta, N.Y., farm team in the New York-Penn league last summer, met with Yankee Manager Billy Martin and Vice President Bill Bergesch. He has a scheduled meeting with Yankees principal owner George Steinbrenner next week, when the club is expected to have its financial package ready.

"We will have our package on the table prior to the NFL draft," said Bergesch. Elway, 22, signed a one-year minor-league contract with the Yankees in 1982 and he will remain Yankee property for the next five years as long as they tender him a contract every spring.

"I have said that I prefer to play football with a West Coast team, and that includes Seattle, as well as Dallas," Elway said. "If there is a big dollar difference in the offers between the Yankees and the NFL it might have a little to do with it, but I doubt that will be a problem.

"I have not said I wouldn't play for the Baltimore Colts (who draft No. 1) if they draft me, but I am not saying that I would play for the Colts, either. Right now it is getting to the sticky point. I don't want to say anything that would offend either the Yankees or the NFL" . . .

Former Dallas Cowboys quarterback Roger Staubach will not return to CBS next year as a color commentator. CBS spokesman Jay Rosenstein said Staubach was not able to devote as much time to his color analyst duties as the network would have liked, and that the parting was amicable. Staubach, 41, said his growing real estate business made it impossible for him to make CBS a priority . . .

The Los Angeles Coliseum Commission wants to avoid costly appeals of the $14.5 million it was awarded from the NFL in an antitrust case. Commissioner Walter Rasic told the Daily News of Los Angeles he would ask his colleagues to consider accepting less than the amount a six-woman federal court jury in Los Angeles awarded the Coliseum in the damage phase of the trial.

Auto Racing: In Le Castellet, France, Alain Prost of France was more than two seconds faster than the rest of the field in landing his turbo-charged Renault on the pole for today's Formula One French Grand Prix. Prost sped round the 3.61-mile circuit, just before the end of the final practice, in 1 minute 36.672 seconds, averaging 134.468 mph.

The 28-year-old Frenchman's American teammate Eddie Cheever had the second fastest qualifying time to put the two Renaults on the front line for the race . . .

Record-setting Rick Mears and seven other drivers shrugged off rule changes designed to slow the Indy-cars and went faster than 200 mph in qualifying for today's Kraco Dixie Twin 200s at Atlanta International Raceway.

Mears, winner of four straight races and five of the last seven on Atlanta's 1.522-mile high-banked oval, drove a new Penske PC-11 racer to a fast lap of 204.983 mph.

Championship Auto Racing Teams and the United States Auto Club, the two competing sanctioning bodies in Indy-car racing, both changed their regulations over the winter in the interest of safety, eliminating sliding side skirts, diminishing the size of rear wings and moving the wings forward . . .

Neil Bonnett came from fourth place to first in final qualifying trials and won the pole position for today's Northwestern Bank 400 NASCAR Grand National race on North Wilkesboro, N.C. . . .

Sonny Simmons of Hoadly, Va., won the 35-lap late model feature on the opening night of the stock-car season at Old Dominion Speedway in Manassas. Simmons, driving a Nova, finished two seconds ahead of Charlie Ford of Richmond, driving a Camaro. Jimmy Dottellis suffered a broken foot when he was involved in a three-car accident on the seventh lap of the race.