Dancing, skating and a good time were on the ice at Capital Centre last night as the World Figure Skating Tour made its stop here.

World champions Scott Hamilton and Rosalynn Sumners were free from the pressures of their newly won titles of March, and they and the other 22 skaters put on a show of grace, artistry, athletics and fun for themselves and the two-thirds-filled arena.

Amateur tours don't have all the glitter and show-biz of the professional circuits, but they are a whole different world than the tension-filled international competitions.

"Competitions are a lot more technical," said Hamilton, 24. "It is so opposite from competition it is incredible.

"We're in a different place every day; four to five cities a week. During competition, I train at home (Denver) and then go straight to the site."

Last night, there were 11 first-half skaters, then a sensational performance by five-time Canadian pair titlists Barbara Underhill and Paul Martini.

Hamilton was clearly the crowd-favorite, getting two standing ovations even before being introduced.

He wowed the crowd with full splits in the air, twists, pirouettes and spins. One fan even draped a "Scott" banner over the railing.

Hamilton got another standing ovation for Spike Jones' "You Always Hurt The One You Love" to close the show.

Other stars had their troubles though. Sumners fell twice during her routine and national dance champions Judy Blumberg and Michael Seibert did slow numbers that failed to get much response.

But pairs champions Kitty and Peter Carruthers won standing ovations for the "Jet Ballet" from "West Side Story" and "America the Beautiful."

Washington is the fifth stop on this 16-city tour, which will end May 16 in Seattle, just minutes from Sumners' home town of Edmonds, Wash.

"The Seattle Coliseum sold out in two days," she said. "I'm really looking forward to going home. Helsinki (the site of the world championships) was fun, but I didn't enjoy last month's European tour because I was homesick."

Sumners, who won her first world title at Helsinki, is considered a slight favorite over Elaine Zayak for the 1984 Olympic gold medal, and after the tour and a seven-week rest, all her thoughts will turn to next February and Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, the site of the Winter Olympics.

"Helsinki was a dream come true," she said. "I had worked 12 years for that. When it ended and I knew I had won, all I could think was that I had made it. But Sarajevo would be even a greater thrill."

Although Sumners is 18 and on her first national tour, it is her last chance for an Olympic medal in the young person's world of figure skating. It is also the last chance for Hamilton, but he is used to last chances.

He took up skating only as therapy for a childhood disease similar to cystic fibrosis. Not only was he cured, but he developed into a world champion skater.

The three-time defending world champion was the U.S. flag bearer at the 1980 Olympics in Lake Placid, where he finished fifth. But he is the heavy favorite to win the 1984 gold. CAPTION: One: Scott Hamilton is in championship form figure skating at Capital Centre. (WP photo by Richard Darcey). Skate Tour Shows Fans Good Time By David Elfin Special to The Washington Post

Dancing, skating and a good time were on the ice at Capital Centre last night as the World Figure Skating Tour made its stop here.

World champions Scott Hamilton and Rosalynn Sumners were free from the pressures of their newly won titles of March, and they and the other 22 skaters put on a show of grace, artistry, athletics and fun for themselves and the two-thirds-filled arena.

Amateur tours don't have all the glitter and show-biz of the professional circuits, but they are a whole different world than the tension-filled international competitions.

"Competitions are a lot more technical," said Hamilton, 24. "It is so opposite from competition it is incredible.

"We're in a different place every day; four to five cities a week. During competition, I train at home (Denver) and then go straight to the site."

Last night, there were 11 first-half skaters, then a sensational performance by five-time Canadian pair titlists Barbara Underhill and Paul Martini.

Hamilton was clearly the crowd-favorite, getting two standing ovations even before being introduced.

He wowed the crowd with full splits in the air, twists, pirouettes and spins. One fan even draped a "Scott" banner over the railing.

Hamilton got another standing ovation for Spike Jones' "You Always Hurt The One You Love" to close the show.

Other stars had their troubles though. Sumners fell twice during her routine and national dance champions Judy Blumberg and Michael Seibert did slow numbers that failed to get much response.

But pairs champions Kitty and Peter Carruthers won standing ovations for the "Jet Ballet" from "West Side Story" and "America the Beautiful."

Washington is the fifth stop on this 16-city tour, which will end May 16 in Seattle, just minutes from Sumners' home town of Edmonds, Wash.

"The Seattle Coliseum sold out in two days," she said. "I'm really looking forward to going home. Helsinki (the site of the world championships) was fun, but I didn't enjoy last month's European tour because I was homesick."

Sumners, who won her first world title at Helsinki, is considered a slight favorite over Elaine Zayak for the 1984 Olympic gold medal, and after the tour and a seven-week rest, all her thoughts will turn to next February and Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, the site of the Winter Olympics.

"Helsinki was a dream come true," she said. "I had worked 12 years for that. When it ended and I knew I had won, all I could think was that I had made it. But Sarajevo would be even a greater thrill."

Although Sumners is 18 and on her first national tour, it is her last chance for an Olympic medal in the young person's world of figure skating. It is also the last chance for Hamilton, but he is used to last chances.

He took up skating only as therapy for a childhood disease similar to cystic fibrosis. Not only was he cured, but he developed into a world champion skater.

The three-time defending world champion was the U.S. flag bearer at the 1980 Olympics in Lake Placid, where he finished fifth. But he is the heavy favorite to win the 1984 gold.Picture, Scott Hamilton is in championship form figure skating at Capital Centre. By Richard Darcey -- The Washington Post