Ed Garvey 20, opponents 7: The NFL Players Association board of player representatives did vote on whether to retain Garvey as the union's executive director, and the ayes had it.

There was one abstention yesterday among the 28 reps gathered in Port St. Lucie, Fla., for the first nuts-and-bolts NFLPA meeting since settlement of the strike that canceled eight games of the 1982 season and brought considerable rank-and-file criticism of Garvey.

No individual breakdown of the balloting--"We're not giving out any names."

Commented Gene Upshaw, NFLPA president: "I couldn't have asked for more than Ed Garvey has given us over the last 12 years. Now labor and management have to lick their wounds and heal and go on with the game" . . .

During three days in Florida, the player reps developed guidelines and a code of ethics for sports agents, voted to certify about 700 agents to represent veteran players (but not rookies) and established fee schedules for them.

And the game goes on. Agent Leigh Steinberg, representing prospective rookie Tony Eason, the Illinois quarterback drafted No. 1 by New England, says the Patriots (whom Steinberg is playing against USFL and Canada's Montreal Concordes) have made "a very good-faith first offer." (Reportedly, $250,000 a year for four years.)

Remarks Steinberg: "We're happy with it as a starting point, but we're in an extraordinary situation. Elway's contract (Stanford quarterback John Elway's reported $1 million a year for five years with Denver) sets somewhat of a new standard for all the first-rounders . . . a breakthrough that takes first-round salaries on a leap 3 1/2 times what came before" . . .

The USFL game goes on without Jeff Knapple, Denver Gold's once first-string quarterback, waived as Coach Red Miller declares, "He just put the ball into the enemy's hands too many times." Knapple beat out (Federal-to-be) Joe Gilliam, but threw nine interceptions and no touchdowns--as the Gold's highest-salaried player: $55,000 . . .

The game goes on without Mean Joe Greene, cut from the NFL-on-CBS booth--a strike casualty, mayhap. The stoppage reduced his rookie announcing season to eight games and the old Steeler realizes "I do need some work at it . . . But I can do it" . . .

And the Art Schlichter case goes on, Ohio State's athletic department doing the "prudent" thing and "asking some questions" about alleged gambling by Schlichter the Buckeye, before Baltimore and big-bucks betting while on Colts' payroll. A Columbus Police Department organized crime bureau officer "told them we had heard rumors . . . but we never investigated Art Schlichter. We don't target bettors, we target bookmakers."