The Miami Dolphins knocked the limelights out of the eyes of the Washington Redskins last night at RFK Stadium. On a humid August evening, the Dolphins vaporized the Redskins, 38-7, in a preseason game that left Redskins' faces an embarrassed shade of burgundy.

"It was a whipping, good and solid," Redskins Coach Joe Gibbs said. "It's time we did some serious thinking."

Perish the Redskins' thoughts of this game: the Dolphins built a 24-0 halftime lead as David Woodley threw two touchdown passes to Duriel Harris. Their defense--this time, Killer Bs with some sting--held Joe Theismann to 32 yards passing, John Riggins to 15 yards on seven carries and the Redskins' to three first downs in the first half.

After Woodley finished his dismantling of the Redskins' secondary with 17 first downs in the first half--rookie left cornerback Darrell Green, making his first start, was beaten time after time--rookie quarterback Dan Marino entered in the second half. He threw a three-yard touchdown pass to Mark Clayton (over Green), making it 31-0 with 4:39 left in the third quarter.

Early in the fourth quarter, the Miami assault continued: running back David Overstreet ran three yards for another touchdown, making it 38-0 with 11:51 left to play. Meanhwile, Redskins rookie quarterback Babe Laufenberg, who completed nine of 17 for 86 yards in the second half, performed adequately, but couldn't create a score.

Only when linebacker Mel Kaufman intercepted Marino's pass and returned it 11 yards for a touchdown with 5:54 left were Redskins fans able to do anything but yawn.

The result left each team with a 1-2 exhibition record.

If last January's 27-17 Super Bowl victory over Miami represented the mountaintop for these Redskins, last night they gurgled about 30,000 leagues under the sea before a national television audience and a sellout of 54,750, some of whom remained until mercy's end.

"Well, we got our revenge on them, huh?" said Miami Coach Don Shula, face stoic as ever. "I'm kidding. I'm kidding. There's no way we can get back what happened in January."

Miami outgained the Redskins, 458 yards to 149. Miami converted 11 of 17 third-down situations, the Redskins three of 13. Miami averaged an inflationary 5.2 yards per offensive play, the Redskins a troubled 2.8 yards. Miami's time of possession advantage was 35:19 to 24:41. Never let it be said that numbers don't speak volumes.

Woodley, who did not complete a pass in the second half of the Super Bowl, seemed in a mood of redemption. He completed 11 of 23 for 186 yards in the first half, zeroing in on a secondary that last night, more than ever, dearly felt the absence of veteran cornerback Jeris White (holding out because of a contract dispute) and Pro Bowl strong safety Tony Peters (arraigned this week on drug trafficking charges).

Constantly, Woodley looked to veteran wide receiver Jimmy Cefalo (four catches for 35 yards), who taught left cornerback Green that things are a little tougher in the NFL than at Texas A&I.

"We certainly felt that (left) side was the side to go to," Shula said.

The Redskins' defense began successfully enough. On Miami's first possession, Woodley's pass to the left flat was deflected by defensive end Dexter Manley. As the ball fluttered toward the ground, near the line of scrimmage at the Miami 38, defensive end Todd Liebenstein dived for the interception.

But the Redskins couldn't capitalize. After their first three plays netted six yards--an accurate omen, it would prove--Mark Mosley's 49-yard field goal attempt was deflected by linebacker Earnest Rhone, falling 15 yards short with 12:25 left in the first quarter.

On the next Miami possession--just after Woodley passed to tight end Dan Johnson, who slipped behind free safety Mark Murphy for a 51-yard gain to the Washington 17--Woodley mishandled a handoff to running back Tony Nathan, causing a fumble that Dolphins Finish Redskins Early In 38-7 Victory By Gary Pomerantz Washington Post Staff Writer

The Miami Dolphins knocked the limelights out of the eyes of the Washington Redskins last night at RFK Stadium. On a humid August evening, the Dolphins vaporized the Redskins, 38-7, in a preseason game that left Redskins' faces an embarrassed shade of burgundy.

"It was a whipping, good and solid," Redskins Coach Joe Gibbs said. "It's time we did some serious thinking."

Perish the Redskins' thoughts of this game: the Dolphins built a 24-0 halftime lead as David Woodley threw two touchdown passes to Duriel Harris. Their defense--this time, Killer Bs with some sting--held Joe Theismann to 32 yards passing, John Riggins to 15 yards on seven carries and the Redskins' to three first downs in the first half.

After Woodley finished his dismantling of the Redskins' secondary with 17 first downs in the first half--rookie left cornerback Darrell Green, making his first start, was beaten time after time--rookie quarterback Dan Marino entered in the second half. He threw a three-yard touchdown pass to Mark Clayton (over Green), making it 31-0 with 4:39 left in the third quarter.

Early in the fourth quarter, the Miami assault continued: running back David Overstreet ran three yards for another touchdown, making it 38-0 with 11:51 left to play. Meanhwile, Redskins rookie quarterback Babe Laufenberg, who completed nine of 17 for 86 yards in the second half, performed adequately, but couldn't create a score.

Only when linebacker Mel Kaufman intercepted Marino's pass and returned it 11 yards for a touchdown with 5:54 left were Redskins fans able to do anything but yawn.

The result left each team with a 1-2 exhibition record.

If last January's 27-17 Super Bowl victory over Miami represented the mountaintop for these Redskins, last night they gurgled about 30,000 leagues under the sea before a national television audience and a sellout of 54,750, some of whom remained until mercy's end.

"Well, we got our revenge on them, huh?" said Miami Coach Don Shula, face stoic as ever. "I'm kidding. I'm kidding. There's no way we can get back what happened in January."

Miami outgained the Redskins, 458 yards to 149. Miami converted 11 of 17 third-down situations, the Redskins three of 13. Miami averaged an inflationary 5.2 yards per offensive play, the Redskins a troubled 2.8 yards. Miami's time of possession advantage was 35:19 to 24:41. Never let it be said that numbers don't speak volumes.

Woodley, who did not complete a pass in the second half of the Super Bowl, seemed in a mood of redemption. He completed 11 of 23 for 186 yards in the first half, zeroing in on a secondary that last night, more than ever, dearly felt the absence of veteran cornerback Jeris White (holding out because of a contract dispute) and Pro Bowl strong safety Tony Peters (arraigned this week on drug trafficking charges).

Constantly, Woodley looked to veteran wide receiver Jimmy Cefalo (four catches for 35 yards), who taught left cornerback Green that things are a little tougher in the NFL than at Texas A&I.

"We certainly felt that (left) side was the side to go to," Shula said.

The Redskins' defense began successfully enough. On Miami's first possession, Woodley's pass to the left flat was deflected by defensive end Dexter Manley. As the ball fluttered toward the ground, near the line of scrimmage at the Miami 38, defensive end Todd Liebenstein dived for the interception.

But the Redskins couldn't capitalize. After their first three plays netted six yards--an accurate omen, it would prove--Mark Mosley's 49-yard field goal attempt was deflected by linebacker Earnest Rhone, falling 15 yards short with 12:25 left in the first quarter.

On the next Miami possession--just after Woodley passed to tight end Dan Johnson, who slipped behind free safety Mark Murphy for a 51-yard gain to the Washington 17--Woodley mishandled a handoff to running back Tony Nathan, causing a fumble that defensive tackle Darryl Grant recovered on the 14.

But the Redskins' offense couldn't budge. Theismann, so sharp in the first two preseason games, completed three of 12 for 32 yards and one interception. Every time Riggins ran left, a gang of Killer Bs awaited. Usually, it was linebacker A.J. Duhe--so marvelous during the playoffs last year, so neutralized by Redskins' deception in the Super Bowl--who created the havoc.

The Dolphins took a 7-0 lead when Woodley passed to Harris for a 23-yard touchdown as the first quarter ended. With Murphy blitzing from the left side, Woodley threw a quick pass over the middle to Harris, slanting inside from the right, past Green, then ducking into the end zone. This ended a 59-yard, 10-play drive that consumed more than 4:30.

The next Miami drive, chock full of more woe for the Redskins' secondary, stretched 85 yards in 13 plays. The Redskins seemed to have Miami stopped at its 24 after Nathan was held to an eight-yard gain on a third-and-20 play. But linebacker Monte Coleman was penalized for a 15-yard personal foul, giving the Dolphins a first down and prolonging the drive.

Three plays later, Woodley fought off pressure from defensive tackle Dave Butz to complete a 41-yard pass deep over the middle to tight end Joe Rose, who beat Murphy, taking the ball to the Washington 17.

With the sellout crowd chanting, "Defense! Defense!" Woodley silenced them all. On third and goal from the seven, Woodley again threw to Harris, slanting across the middle deep into the end zone, past cornerback Vernon Dean for the touchdown. This gave Miami a 14-0 lead with 6:20 left in the half.

On the Redskins' next possession, Theismann faced a familiar third-and-10 situation. He overthrew wide receiver Alvin Garrett, racing off to the right side. By the time Garrett turned around, free safety Lyle Blackwood had intercepted the pass, returning it 28 yards to the Washington 15.

Theismann snapped off his chin strap, furious at himself. After a 10-yard completion from Woodley to Cefalo, who beat Green, moved the ball to the two, Andra Franklin ran the final two yards for the touchdown. Franklin was untouched, sweeping around the left side for the touchdown that made it 21-0 with 4:52 left in the half.

The first-half demolition wasn't yet over. The Dolphins regained possession on their 34 yard line with 2:59 left in the half. With one second left, Uwe von Schamann kicked a 35-yard field goal. It was 24-0 Miami. the Redskins looked miserable.

"About the only good thing tonight was our fans," Gibbs said. "They were terrific."

Redskin tight end Clint Didier suffered a bruised right leg and free safety Curtis Jordan a bruised right hand against Miami. Neither injury is believed to be serious.