Warren Powers was fired as coach after the University of Missouri finished with its worst record in 13 years, 3-7-1.

Although it was Powers' first losing season in seven years at Missouri, there was concern about home attendance, which dropped from about 60,000 to about 40,000.

"I know if you stick around coaching long enough, you'll have a bad year," Powers said at a press conference. "It's been a very difficult year, a very trying year. It's been like a dog's life. We had high expectations for the football team."

In seven seasons, Powers had a record of 46-33-3. He took the Tigers to five bowl games, winning three. He will be paid off for the final two years of his three-year contract . . .

Former University of Miami coach Howard Schnellenberger said reports he had signed to be the new coach at Louisville were "the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard."

Schnellenberger, in a telephone interview, said he had not signed a contract or made a verbal agreement with Louisville, but is interested in the position.

Louisville sports information director Kenny Klein said, "I've heard that he is leaning towards coming here, but he hasn't told us definitely he's coming and he has not signed his name to a contract." . . .

A Southeastern Conference spokesman said decisions on allowing Florida to retain its title and play in the Sugar Bowl will be treated as separate issues at an executive committee meeting today.

Florida won its first championship in the 52-year history of the SEC with a 5-0-1 conference record, but the Gators face three years probation for violation of NCAA rules.

Steve Townsend, assistant commissioner for public relations, would not confirm reports an agreement had been worked out that would allow the Gators to retain the league title, but voluntarily forsake the Sugar Bowl. "Nothing definite has been decided," he said . . .

Charley Pell, fired as Florida's coach as a result of the NCAA rules infractions, told the Atlanta Touchdown Club that a newspaper should investigate the NCAA "because it needs a magnifying glass of its own very desperately. The facts are simply this: you cannot cooperate with 'em and expect a fair deal . . . You must fight them every step of the way and cooperation means nothing. You can't trust anything they say and you better be wary of the tactics they use, because they use some weird ones." . . .

Bob Lee, athletic director at Tennessee State, said his program is "above board," but may be ordered to forfeit its 11 victories this season because of past NCAA rules infractions. The NCAA has barred TSU from the NCAA I-AA playoffs after the school declared 14 players, three starters, ineligible for this season. TSU was 11-0 and had been ranked No. 1 in Division I-AA . . .

The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to open competition for college football telecasts has drastically cut into revenues at most small schools and could eventually end some sports programs, according to some college representatives. The major difficulty is decreased attendance due to increased television viewing.

Sen. Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) conducted a hearing to assess the effects of the decision and to try to find solutions for problems it has raised. Grassley said he will take the information back to the Senate Judiciary Committee, which oversees antitrust cases, in an effort to get the committee to consider the issue . . .

University of Colorado player Ed Reinhardt, hospitalized since receiving a head injury in a game at Oregon Sept. 15, was moved to a new hospital to begin physical rehabilitation.

University Hospital spokesman Tom Rees described Reinhardt as "semiresponsive" to doctors' commands and said he has been able to sit upright, "but whether he is really conscious of somebody there is hard to say.