On June 1, Sean Jones received the Eugene (Butch) Eseman Award as the most victorious apprentice jockey at Pimlico's spring meeting. On June 3, highly regarded trainers Dick Dutrow and Ron Alfano replaced Jones as their No. 1 rider.

"I heard rumors that they were bringing in somebody from New York," Jones said. "I found out for sure when I looked at the overnight (Bowie entries) for Monday."

Instead of Jones, the name Ramirez was listed alongside Dutrow/Alfano entries. Martin Ramirez, 20, was largely unknown to Maryland racing fans, but only briefly.

Ramirez and Greg Hutton lead jockeys this meeting with 16 victories each, although Ramirez, with 61 mounts, has had 18 fewer races. Ramirez also has finished third or better in 62 percent of his starts, tops among jockeys with at least five victories.

Originally from Tijuana, Mexico, Ramirez rode in southern California before moving east. He won only seven races in two months in New York, but Dutrow took note nonetheless.

"What impressed me is that (Ramirez) is not a boy in a hurry, which is unusual for an apprentice," Dutrow said. "I just asked him if he'd like the opportunity to ride every day (in Maryland), and he said yes."

Another factor: Ramirez retains his apprenticeship until Dec. 10; Jones loses his five-pound weight allowance July 23.

"This is nothing personal against Sean," Alfano said. "But if you're going to go for the five pounds, why not go for the one who's going to be around longer?"

Jones, meanwhile, is adjusting. His mounts have not decreased in number, only in quality.

"It hurts a little not getting the live horses," Jones said. "The fans here don't realize it's not the same quality of horses I'm riding."

Yesterday, Jones offered evidence to the contrary, winning four of five races to move into fourth place with 11 victories.

Ohio Derby winner Skip Trial probably will race next in Bowie's $100,000-added Governor's Cup Handicap, according to Pimlico co-owner Ben Cohen. Cohen's wife, Zelda, owns Skip Trial, who won the Ohio Derby by 4 1/2 lengths under jockey Jean-Luc Samyn.

Trainer Marvin Moncrief said jockey Pat Day has committed to ride Diamond Rich in the Governor's Cup. Moncrief plans to run Diamond Rich as an entry with Don's Choice, an impressive winner Monday in an $11,000 allowance race at Bowie.

A 2-year-old filly raced June 13 without a tattoo or foal papers, spurring an investigation by Bowie officials.

Bowie stewards would not identify the horse, but they disclosed it was not the winner, who was making her debut. The race's only other first-time starter was Gold Spoon, who finished last in a field of five.

Horses receive numerical tattoos inside the lip to ensure proper identification; however, a horse is allowed one race without a tattoo if foal papers match the horse's markings and are filed with the horse identifier before post time or if the Jockey Club verifies that the markings are accurate. Bowie officials refused to comment pending completion of the investigation, but Racing Secretary Lawrence Abbundi said, "This is nothing new. Ultimately, it could result in a trainer being fined $25."

Because of a 27.5 percent increase in handle, Bowie has bolstered its purses by about $7,000 daily, retroactive to June 3.

June 13 was not a complete loss for Joe Altobelli, who was at Bowie a few hours before being officially fired as Baltimore Orioles manager. Altobelli cashed in on a 4-to-1 shot that won the second race. The name of the filly: Will Be Alright. HORSE RACING By Vinnie Perrone Special to The Washington Post

On June 1, Sean Jones received the Eugene (Butch) Eseman Award as the most victorious apprentice jockey at Pimlico's spring meeting. On June 3, highly regarded trainers Dick Dutrow and Ron Alfano replaced Jones as their No. 1 rider.

"I heard rumors that they were bringing in somebody from New York," Jones said. "I found out for sure when I looked at the overnight (Bowie entries) for Monday."

Instead of Jones, the name Ramirez was listed alongside Dutrow/Alfano entries. Martin Ramirez, 20, was largely unknown to Maryland racing fans, but only briefly.

Ramirez and Greg Hutton lead jockeys this meeting with 16 victories each, although Ramirez, with 61 mounts, has had 18 fewer races. Ramirez also has finished third or better in 62 percent of his starts, tops among jockeys with at least five victories.

Originally from Tijuana, Mexico, Ramirez rode in southern California before moving east. He won only seven races in two months in New York, but Dutrow took note nonetheless.

"What impressed me is that (Ramirez) is not a boy in a hurry, which is unusual for an apprentice," Dutrow said. "I just asked him if he'd like the opportunity to ride every day (in Maryland), and he said yes."

Another factor: Ramirez retains his apprenticeship until Dec. 10; Jones loses his five-pound weight allowance July 23.

"This is nothing personal against Sean," Alfano said. "But if you're going to go for the five pounds, why not go for the one who's going to be around longer?"

Jones, meanwhile, is adjusting. His mounts have not decreased in number, only in quality.

"It hurts a little not getting the live horses," Jones said. "The fans here don't realize it's not the same quality of horses I'm riding."

Yesterday, Jones offered evidence to the contrary, winning four of five races to move into fourth place with 11 victories.

Ohio Derby winner Skip Trial probably will race next in Bowie's $100,000-added Governor's Cup Handicap, according to Pimlico co-owner Ben Cohen. Cohen's wife, Zelda, owns Skip Trial, who won the Ohio Derby by 4 1/2 lengths under jockey Jean-Luc Samyn.

Trainer Marvin Moncrief said jockey Pat Day has committed to ride Diamond Rich in the Governor's Cup. Moncrief plans to run Diamond Rich as an entry with Don's Choice, an impressive winner Monday in an $11,000 allowance race at Bowie.

A 2-year-old filly raced June 13 without a tattoo or foal papers, spurring an investigation by Bowie officials.

Bowie stewards would not identify the horse, but they disclosed it was not the winner, who was making her debut. The race's only other first-time starter was Gold Spoon, who finished last in a field of five.

Horses receive numerical tattoos inside the lip to ensure proper identification; however, a horse is allowed one race without a tattoo if foal papers match the horse's markings and are filed with the horse identifier before post time or if the Jockey Club verifies that the markings are accurate. Bowie officials refused to comment pending completion of the investigation, but Racing Secretary Lawrence Abbundi said, "This is nothing new. Ultimately, it could result in a trainer being fined $25."

Because of a 27.5 percent increase in handle, Bowie has bolstered its purses by about $7,000 daily, retroactive to June 3.

June 13 was not a complete loss for Joe Altobelli, who was at Bowie a few hours before being officially fired as Baltimore Orioles manager. Altobelli cashed in on a 4-to-1 shot that won the second race. The name of the filly: Will Be Alright.