Dick Stockton is one of CBS' jack-of-all-trade sportscasters, capable of play-by-play or studio work, versatile enough to do swimming and gymnastics as well as baseball and basketball.

Call him a talented utility man, but he'll politely shy away from such a label. "I wince when I hear the word utility," said Stockton, who will join analyst Sam Huff on Washington Redskins preseason telecasts. "Utility is the infielder who hits .252, pinch runs and shags flies."

Even though he's more comfortable with an NBA or NCAA basketball game, Stockton, 43, has adjusted to broadcasting such events as figure skating.

"I don't feel naked about it," he said, "because the general expertise of the public is minimal. I'm in the role of a reporter. My job is: what's it all about, who's competing. I'm not an expert. I don't have to describe the triple Salchows in skating."

Unlike many of his peers, Stockton prefers TV to radio.

"I like the fact that the picture's there. I like to go beyond the craft of play-by-play. TV allows you to do that. Take basketball on radio -- you've got to describe everything, where the ball is at the time. No room for anything else.

"Television affords you luxuries. I like putting captions on pictures."

One of Stockton's assets is his remarkable memory. "I'm not flawless," he said. "But, for instance, I could tell you who started in 1951 for all National League teams. Going back to 1957, I could list NCAA finalists' rosters.

"When I was at Syracuse, I'd go into the car and listen to out-of-town baseball games. I would've gotten straight As if exams were on sports."

Logic professors teach a basic premise, telling us that all the world, for instance, can be divided into two groups -- cats and noncats. Similarly, all the world might be divided into two other categories -- topics of interest in which ABC's Howard Cosell has an opinion and topics of interest in which Cosell does not have an opinion.

But of course, the latter category does not exist.

Herewith is a Howard Cosell sampler, taken from a recent interview:

On his value to ABC: "If I wanted to, I could go back to boxing and triple the ratings and return to 'Monday Night Football' and save it. I've gotten thousands of letters saying, 'Come back, come back.' I won't go back. I'm a man."

On college basketball: "Basketball is a complex sport. If you've got a 7-foot player, you've got to win 90 percent of your games. If you've got two 7-footers, you win the NCAA championship unless you've got Joe B. Hall as a coach."

On New York Post columnist Dick Young, long an antagonist: "An antiquated relic of yesteryear without a great deal of credibility, but still reaching a certain low level of the population."

On the NFL's Giants and Jets leaving New York City: "The Giants left as a hoax, a front for a race track. New York is not New Jersey. We have not changed the geography of this nation. We have not changed our voting jurisdictions or our tax jurisdictions. It's unbelievable -- New York City loses, at a minimum, in business per year from the loss of those two teams, $160 million."

On New Jersey: "New Jersey is the single most troubled urban-area state in the United States. Four miles south of the Meadowlands is Newark . . . Jersey City, Asbury Park, Trenton. One city after another. Camden. God, what travail."

On hosting "The Battle of the Network Stars" for nine years: "They've vilified me. 'That's not journalism,' they said. Whoever said it was? 'The Battle of the Network Stars' is probably the purest show I ever did. No pretense about it -- a prime-time entertainment show. No Mickey Mousing, no falsified transcripts, no under-the-table payments."

On newspaper TV critics: "The lowest element of the journalistic fraternity."

NBC Sports is pushing Harry Coyle for consideration in baseball's Hall of Fame. Coyle, a director for 38 years and SPORTS WAVES For Utility, Stockton Is in Select Company By Norman Chad Washington Post Staff Writer

Dick Stockton is one of CBS' jack-of-all-trade sportscasters, capable of play-by-play or studio work, versatile enough to do swimming and gymnastics as well as baseball and basketball.

Call him a talented utility man, but he'll politely shy away from such a label. "I wince when I hear the word utility," said Stockton, who will join analyst Sam Huff on Washington Redskins preseason telecasts. "Utility is the infielder who hits .252, pinch runs and shags flies."

Even though he's more comfortable with an NBA or NCAA basketball game, Stockton, 43, has adjusted to broadcasting such events as figure skating.

"I don't feel naked about it," he said, "because the general expertise of the public is minimal. I'm in the role of a reporter. My job is: what's it all about, who's competing. I'm not an expert. I don't have to describe the triple Salchows in skating."

Unlike many of his peers, Stockton prefers TV to radio.

"I like the fact that the picture's there. I like to go beyond the craft of play-by-play. TV allows you to do that. Take basketball on radio -- you've got to describe everything, where the ball is at the time. No room for anything else.

"Television affords you luxuries. I like putting captions on pictures."

One of Stockton's assets is his remarkable memory. "I'm not flawless," he said. "But, for instance, I could tell you who started in 1951 for all National League teams. Going back to 1957, I could list NCAA finalists' rosters.

"When I was at Syracuse, I'd go into the car and listen to out-of-town baseball games. I would've gotten straight As if exams were on sports."

Logic professors teach a basic premise, telling us that all the world, for instance, can be divided into two groups -- cats and noncats. Similarly, all the world might be divided into two other categories -- topics of interest in which ABC's Howard Cosell has an opinion and topics of interest in which Cosell does not have an opinion.

But of course, the latter category does not exist.

Herewith is a Howard Cosell sampler, taken from a recent interview:

*On his value to ABC: "If I wanted to, I could go back to boxing and triple the ratings and return to 'Monday Night Football' and save it. I've gotten thousands of letters saying, 'Come back, come back.' I won't go back. I'm a man."

*On college basketball: "Basketball is a complex sport. If you've got a 7-foot player, you've got to win 90 percent of your games. If you've got two 7-footers, you win the NCAA championship unless you've got Joe B. Hall as a coach."

*On New York Post columnist Dick Young, long an antagonist: "An antiquated relic of yesteryear without a great deal of credibility, but still reaching a certain low level of the population."

*On the NFL's Giants and Jets leaving New York City: "The Giants left as a hoax, a front for a race track. New York is not New Jersey. We have not changed the geography of this nation. We have not changed our voting jurisdictions or our tax jurisdictions. It's unbelievable -- New York City loses, at a minimum, in business per year from the loss of those two teams, $160 million."

*On New Jersey: "New Jersey is the single most troubled urban-area state in the United States. Four miles south of the Meadowlands is Newark . . . Jersey City, Asbury Park, Trenton. One city after another. Camden. God, what travail."

*On hosting "The Battle of the Network Stars" for nine years: "They've vilified me. 'That's not journalism,' they said. Whoever said it was? 'The Battle of the Network Stars' is probably the purest show I ever did. No pretense about it -- a prime-time entertainment show. No Mickey Mousing, no falsified transcripts, no under-the-table payments."

*On newspaper TV critics: "The lowest element of the journalistic fraternity."

NBC Sports is pushing Harry Coyle for consideration in baseball's Hall of Fame. Coyle, a director for 38 years and currently NBC's coordinating producer of baseball, has directed 26 All-Star Games and 34 World Series.

"Harry's literally the Abner Doubleday of televised baseball," said Michael Weisman, NBC Sports' executive producer. "He paints pictures with cameras. Harry started the center field camera. Baseball would have been in the dark otherwise." currently NBC's coordinating producer of baseball, has directed 26 All-Star Games and 34 World Series.

"Harry's literally the Abner Doubleday of televised baseball," said Michael Weisman, NBC Sports' executive producer. "He paints pictures with cameras. Harry started the center field camera. Baseball would have been in the dark otherwise."