The San Francisco Giants will discuss their desire to leave Candlestick Park, perhaps temporarily for Denver, with a committee of National League executives today.

League President Chub Feeney said he will join Peter O'Malley of the Los Angeles Dodgers, Ballard Smith of the San Diego Padres and Bill Giles of the Philadelphia Phillies in a meeting with Giants owner Bob Lurie.

All of the NL clubs received a letter from the San Francisco city attorney in September threatening them with lawsuits if they approved a move by the Giants that breached the team's lease at Candlestick Park.

Lurie has said several times that under his ownership, the Giants will not play again at cold and windy Candlestick, where they have a lease through 1994, but that he is determined to keep the Giants in San Francisco . . .

The American League's East Division has at least 12 players earning at least $1 million per season, but the division-champion Toronto Blue Jays do not have a player in the group, according to a report in USA Today.

Toronto pitcher Dave Stieb came the closest to earning $1 million in 1985, with a salary of $913,636.

Players in the AL East earning at least $1 million per season are Baltimore's Fred Lynn ($1,000,000) and Eddie Murray ($1,250,000, including deferred payments); Boston's Jim Rice ($1,281,557) and Wade Boggs ($1,000,000); Cleveland's Andre Thornton ($1,100,000); Detroit's Darrell Evans ($1,068,333); Milwaukee's Rollie Fingers ($1,065,000), Paul Molitor ($1,010,000) and Ted Simmons ($1,000,000), and New York's Dave Winfield ($1,770,000), Rickey Henderson ($1,470,000) and Ken Griffey ($1,075,000) . . .

Reggie Jackson, whose contract with the California Angels expired at the end of this past season, has exercised his option to play for the team in 1986. Jackson, 39, who batted .252 with 27 home runs and 85 RBI, had been seeking a raise from an annual salary of $975,000 and a one-year extension on his contract. The Angels agreed only to the 1986 season at the same salary . . .

Joe Altobelli, dismissed last season as manager of the Baltimore Orioles, is returning to the New York Yankees as a coach on Manager Lou Piniella's staff, according to a report in the New York Times. Altobelli coached third base for the Yankees before replacing Earl Weaver with Baltimore in 1983.