On the same day the Washington Redskins' offensive line regained its original form after being bent out of shape by injuries for seven weeks, the flu bug struck again at Redskin Park. Wide receiver Art Monk was in bed yesterday and in some doubt for Sunday's game against the San Francisco 49ers at RFK Stadium.

Running back John Riggins, who probably will start Sunday, missed two days of practice this week because of the flu.

"Art's got a bout with the flu," Coach Joe Gibbs said after practice yesterday. "We thought it best that we get him home. I think it's the same thing John had."

Trainer Bubba Tyer said team physician Donald Knowlan was to examine Monk at home last night. If Monk can't play, Mark McGrath, who came off the injured reserve list one week ago, would start, Gibbs said.

If quarterback Jay Schroeder can't throw to his top receiver, at least he will have the combination that started the season as the offensive line blocking in front of him -- left tackle Joe Jacoby, left guard Russ Grimm, center Rick Donnalley, right guard Ken Huff and right tackle Mark May.

Grimm, who sprained his left ankle in Sunday's 30-23 victory over the Steelers, practiced yesterday for the first time this week. Grimm came out yesterday a few minutes later than the rest of the team after getting treatment and was greeted with a round of half-sarcastic, half-encouraging applause. He tested the ankle, then worked the entire offensive session.

"It feels pretty good," he said afterward.

All of the offensive lineman have, in varying degrees, been banged, battered and bruised. Consequently, there has been considerable shuffling of people and positions.

"Hopefully," Grimm said, "we can get back to the regular five."

Isn't it getting harder to remember the "regular five"?

"That's it, exactly," Grimm said. "The five most healthy, that's who they are."

Redskins publicist Charlie Taylor saw Jeff Bostic in the locker room before yesterday's practice and asked, half-jokingly, "Are you playing tackle this week?" Bostic, who missed the first six games of the year following knee surgery, started at center against the Steelers, then moved to guard when Grimm was hurt. This week he'll come off the bench.

Jacoby, who has missed the past six games with a sprained knee, practiced all week and seems ready to play. Dan McQuaid had replaced Jacoby during that time, although he too was nicked in the Pittsburgh game. Grimm played tackle at times during Jacoby's absence.

When Bostic moved to guard in the Pittsburgh game, he was replaced at center by Donnalley, who had started the previous 11 games at center before fracturing his left hand against the Giants Nov. 18. Donnalley, who will wear a cast for three or four more weeks, will start Sunday, Gibbs said.

Right guard Ken Huff, who broke a big toe earlier in the year and continued to play, and right tackle Mark May, who has sore ribs, "have been solid all year," said Joe Bugel, assistant head coach/offense.

The remarkable aspect is that the line had its best game of the season last Sunday, not allowing a sack.

"We were overdue for a game with no sacks," Donnalley said. "These past two games could have gone either way. It's a credit to the character of the people that we hung in there. When you shut out somebody (in sacks), it's not just the offensive line, but the receivers, tight ends and the quarterback.

"It takes away when you have to plug people in and out. You try to adjust during the week. When Russ Grimm's not in there, it hurts the most, because he does a good job doing his job but he also makes a lot of good (blocking) calls when the defense comes up with something hairy."

Donnalley also thinks the time of year has something to do with performance.

"I think the intensity is getting a little greater as we near the end of the season," he said. "Maybe that's the way this team is. Each game is worth Monk Catches the Flu, Might Miss 49ers Game By Dave Sell Washington Post Staff Writer

On the same day the Washington Redskins' offensive line regained its original form after being bent out of shape by injuries for seven weeks, the flu bug struck again at Redskin Park. Wide receiver Art Monk was in bed yesterday and in some doubt for Sunday's game against the San Francisco 49ers at RFK Stadium.

Running back John Riggins, who probably will start Sunday, missed two days of practice this week because of the flu.

"Art's got a bout with the flu," Coach Joe Gibbs said after practice yesterday. "We thought it best that we get him home. I think it's the same thing John had."

Trainer Bubba Tyer said team physician Donald Knowlan was to examine Monk at home last night. If Monk can't play, Mark McGrath, who came off the injured reserve list one week ago, would start, Gibbs said.

If quarterback Jay Schroeder can't throw to his top receiver, at least he will have the combination that started the season as the offensive line blocking in front of him -- left tackle Joe Jacoby, left guard Russ Grimm, center Rick Donnalley, right guard Ken Huff and right tackle Mark May.

Grimm, who sprained his left ankle in Sunday's 30-23 victory over the Steelers, practiced yesterday for the first time this week. Grimm came out yesterday a few minutes later than the rest of the team after getting treatment and was greeted with a round of half-sarcastic, half-encouraging applause. He tested the ankle, then worked the entire offensive session.

"It feels pretty good," he said afterward.

All of the offensive lineman have, in varying degrees, been banged, battered and bruised. Consequently, there has been considerable shuffling of people and positions.

"Hopefully," Grimm said, "we can get back to the regular five."

Isn't it getting harder to remember the "regular five"?

"That's it, exactly," Grimm said. "The five most healthy, that's who they are."

Redskins publicist Charlie Taylor saw Jeff Bostic in the locker room before yesterday's practice and asked, half-jokingly, "Are you playing tackle this week?" Bostic, who missed the first six games of the year following knee surgery, started at center against the Steelers, then moved to guard when Grimm was hurt. This week he'll come off the bench.

Jacoby, who has missed the past six games with a sprained knee, practiced all week and seems ready to play. Dan McQuaid had replaced Jacoby during that time, although he too was nicked in the Pittsburgh game. Grimm played tackle at times during Jacoby's absence.

When Bostic moved to guard in the Pittsburgh game, he was replaced at center by Donnalley, who had started the previous 11 games at center before fracturing his left hand against the Giants Nov. 18. Donnalley, who will wear a cast for three or four more weeks, will start Sunday, Gibbs said.

Right guard Ken Huff, who broke a big toe earlier in the year and continued to play, and right tackle Mark May, who has sore ribs, "have been solid all year," said Joe Bugel, assistant head coach/offense.

The remarkable aspect is that the line had its best game of the season last Sunday, not allowing a sack.

"We were overdue for a game with no sacks," Donnalley said. "These past two games could have gone either way. It's a credit to the character of the people that we hung in there. When you shut out somebody (in sacks), it's not just the offensive line, but the receivers, tight ends and the quarterback.

"It takes away when you have to plug people in and out. You try to adjust during the week. When Russ Grimm's not in there, it hurts the most, because he does a good job doing his job but he also makes a lot of good (blocking) calls when the defense comes up with something hairy."

Donnalley also thinks the time of year has something to do with performance.

"I think the intensity is getting a little greater as we near the end of the season," he said. "Maybe that's the way this team is. Each game is worth more, and when we start playing like there's no tomorrow, we play well. Now we realize that we can put our bodies on the line and give it all you got. If we win, great. If we lose, we have six months to rest up." more, and when we start playing like there's no tomorrow, we play well. Now we realize that we can put our bodies on the line and give it all you got. If we win, great. If we lose, we have six months to rest up."