KANSAS CITY, MO., JULY 18 -- If you liked the 1987 All-Star Game, you're going to love the 1989 version, which is tentatively scheduled for the twilight hour at Anaheim Stadium. The last two all-star games in twilight hours have featured six runs and 37 strikeouts.

Next year's game will be in Cincinnati, and there's strong sentiment to have it in Wrigley Field in 1990. By then, almost everyone expects Wrigley to have lights.

For the first time, a majority of the all-stars played college baseball -- 30 of 56. Nevertheless, on an afternoon when millions were tuned into the televised Iran-contra hearings, the National Leaguers had dialed their clubhouse television to the afternoon cartoons.

New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner was upset about the way his players were used in the game. Steinbrenner didn't think Willie Randolph should have been playing and especially didn't like Dave Winfield playing 13 innings.

Likewise, the Toronto Blue Jays were furious that John McNamara left Tom Henke in for 2 2/3 innings, while protecting his own Bruce Hurst. "He showed a complete lack of common sense," Blue Jays Manager Jimy Williams said.

The West Isn't the Best

How weak is the National League West? At the all-star break, it had the worst record of any of the four divisions, and between June 1 and the break only Houston (20-19) had a winning record. The division is so bad the Dodgers lost six of eight before the break and still gained half a game on the Reds.

The Astros look like the best team in a bad division, especially if rookie third baseman Ken Caminiti is as good as Houston scouts believe. He homered in his first game after being promoted from Class AA.

At the break, the Astros had just eight homers and 25 RBI from their third basemen, way down from the 13 homers and 59 RBI at the break last season . . .

The Yankees were desperate for infield help even before Randolph went on the disabled list. They've apparently talked to the Orioles about Jackie Gutierrez, the Braves about Glenn Hubbard and the Red Sox about Glenn Hoffman. The Yankees wanted Tony Bernazard from the Indians, but didn't have a pitcher to offer . . .

Through Thursday, the Brewers were 28-13 when Paul Molitor started, 15-30 when he didn't . . . The Cleveland Indians didn't hire Doc Edwards as an interim manager, although he didn't get a multiyear contract. A likeable, rah-rah guy, he managed 13 years in the minors. He was manager of the year in the minors four times. Meanwhile, the Indians apparently can't figure out what to do with Andre Thornton. He's had a couple of meetings to discuss moving to the front office, but was told he was still a player. He's not actually. He has only 68 at-bats and effectively leaves Edwards with only 13 nonpitchers . . .

The St. Louis Cardinals, on a pace to win 105 games, have gotten 30 saves from five relievers. They also may get John Tudor back in about three weeks. After they finish up this trip west, they have only five more games on natural grass. They're 38-23 on artificial turf . . . The University of Iowa quarterback this fall is expected to be 6-8 David McGwire, brother of the Oakland A's first baseman Mark . . .

The Floyd Bannister sweepstakes goes on, and he now appears to be headed for Oakland if he winds up leaving the Chicago White Sox at all . . . Fernando Valenzuela got his first shutout in 43 starts Thursday night, and after the game said: "The second half is very important for us because there is no third half."

Job security? Manager Sparky Anderson took over the Detroit Tigers in 1979 and won a World Series in 1984. Since then, every other American League team has changed managers at least once . . . A spokesman for Peter Ueberroth denies that the commissioner discouraged the Montreal Expos from bringing Pascual Perez to the majors or that he tried to get the Texas Rangers not to sign Steve Howe. Still, some people on those teams front offices aren't so sure. . . The A's are interested in Don Baylor, whom the Red Sox are shopping. Pawtucket first baseman/DH Sam Horn is tearing up the International League, and that may lead to Bill Buckner's release . . .

Is pitching bad? Ray Burris, a front office staffer for the Brewers, went to scout the club's Class A team at Stockton, Calif., and wound up adding himself to their roster. He may yet be brought back to the major leagues . . . The pitiful Dodgers have already used seven third basemen -- Bill Madlock, Tracy Woodson, Jeff Hamilton, Mickey Hatcher, Phil Garner, Steve Sax and Dave Anderson. When asked about Ron Cey, who was released by the A's this week, Dodgers Manager Tommy Lasorda said, "We've already got enough third basemen."

At their current pace, Bo Jackson will strike out 221 times, Pete Incaviglia 205. San Francisco's Bobby Bonds set the all-time record in 1970 with 189 . . . San Diego's Tony Gwynn is the National League hitter most often compared to Wade Boggs, but he said, "I watch him on satellite games a lot. I look at Boggs as being the kind of hitter I want to be. He's a lot more patient than I am." . . . The Indians claim that Royals Manager Billy Gardner held a pregame meeting last week and announced that the first hitter of the game would be knocked down. Danny Jackson's knockdown of leadoff man Brett Butler led to a brawl, and Butler's five-game suspension could cost him $21,000 . . .

One That Got Away

Cubs General Manager Dallas Green traded Steve Trout without consulting Manager Gene Michael. "Gene doesn't consult me when he wants to bunt," Green said. "Why should I consult him when I want to make a trade?" . . . Northwest Airlines lost Kirby Puckett's luggage on the return flight from the All-Star Game, and he was the designated hitter Thursday night because he didn't want to break in a new glove . . . Before this season, Gary Ward had hit only .198 at Yankee Stadium. This season, he's hitting .297 with 35 RBI there.