Despite a 65-0 rout of Tulsa, Oklahoma lost ground in the Associated Press football rankings, although the Sooners remained No. 1 for the fifth week in a row. Oklahoma received 44 of 60 first-place votes and 1,181 of a possible 1,200 points from a nationwide panel of sportswriters and sportscasters.

Twelve first-place votes and 1,136 points went to Nebraska, which has been No. 2 every week this season. The Cornhuskers defeated Arizona State Saturday, 35-28.

Last week, Oklahoma led Nebraska, 53-7, in first-place votes and by 1,193 points to 1,129 . . .

University of Tennessee officials have denied Sport magazine's charge that football coach Johnny Majors and Athletic Director Doug Dickey plotted to cover up improper sales of complimentary game tickets.

"Any insinuation that we were hiding anything or trying to cover anything is entirely untrue," Dickey said at a news conference.

An article in Sport's November issue quotes former Tennessee athletes who said they regularly sold complimentary game passes with the assistance of boosters and university coaches. The magazine says more than a dozen former Tennessee players admitted receiving "as much as $2,000 annually through a system of ticket sales."

The article also says the school's six-month internal investigation last year of alleged wrongdoing in the athletic department was "itself improper and many of its conclusions false."

University President Edward Boling and Chancellor Jack Reese said in a joint statement, "The suggestion made by Sport magazine that the University of Tennessee Investigating Committee either attempted or did, in fact, cover up any wrongdoing in its athletics program is categorically denied" . . .

Raymond M. Burse, the president of Kentucky State, has been named chairman of a special NCAA subcommittee that will review minority opportunities in intercollegiate athletics. Burse was named to chair the subcommittee appointed last week by the NCAA administrative committee in response to a recommendation by the NCAA Committee on Review and Planning.

The subcommittee will address the issue of opportunities for ethnic minorities -- particularly blacks -- in college athletics. It will pay particular attention to coaching and administration . . .

Michigan football coach Bo Schembechler was hospitalized early yesterday with a kidney stone problem and offensive coordinator Gary Moeller took over his duties, officials said. Schembechler, 58, was taken to an undisclosed Ann Arbor hospital at about 3:30 a.m., said Bruce Madej, sports information director at the school.

If Schembechler misses Saturday's home game against Wisconsin, it would mark only the second time he's missed a game since 1969, his first season as coach of the Wolverines. He suffered a heart attack at the end of that season that forced him to miss the 1970 Rose Bowl against Southern California . . .

The NCAA Committee on Infractions will consider allegations of improprieties in Virginia Tech's basketball and football programs during a meeting this weekend at NCAA headquarters in Mission, Kan., Tech officials said.