DETROIT, OCT. 3 -- It appears the St. Louis Cardinals will be without Jack Clark the rest of their season and, if so, there might not be that much left. A half dozen teammates -- Ozzie Smith, Vince Coleman and Terry Pendleton, in particular -- have had terrific seasons, but none can do what Clark does.

In the 126 games he started, the Cardinals were 76-50 and averaged 5.31 runs.

In the 33 games he missed (through Thursday) they were just another decent team, going 18-15 and averaging 3.64 runs. His injuries cost him a spectacular season: Since going into the all-star break with 86 RBI, he has had 20 . . .

There might be a major shakeup of the Los Angeles Dodgers this month. At one time, it was thought that Peter O'Malley would simply promote Fred Claire to general manager and keep Tommy Lasorda as manager (which would lead to Lasorda's leaving).

Now, there are rumors in the front office that O'Malley is interviewing potential general managers, with Joe Morgan's name mentioned . . .

The San Francisco Giants say they're not worried about Rick Reuschel, but their No. 1 starter has picked a bad time to slump. Since a two-hitter against Houston two weeks ago, he has totaled 8 2/3 innings in three starts and has allowed 18 hits and 16 earned runs (16.62 ERA). He said he has been experimenting with some new breaking pitches and was tuning up for Tuesday's start against the Cardinals in the National League Championship Series . . .

The Chicago White Sox have the best record in the American League West since the all-star break, and Floyd Bannister has been no small part of that. Since Aug. 18, he has gone 7-1 with a 1.35 ERA. His only loss was on an unearned run . . . Milwaukee (48-26 through Thursday) has the best record in the AL East in the second half, and recently went 6-1 against Toronto and Detroit. "We better be thankful they weren't a hair behind us," Tigers Manager Sparky Anderson said.

Literal Parity

This is parity: Since 1978, no National League team has repeated as division champion, and every team in the league has finished first at least once . . .

Boston's Roger Clemens has quietly recovered from a bad start to put together a tremendous season, one good enough to get him a second straight Cy Young Award. He will seek his 20th victory Sunday, and he leads the majors in complete games (17) and shutouts (six). He's second in strikeouts (244), third in ERA (3.07) and has won 15 of his last 18 decisions . . .

If the Cardinals end up playing the Minnesota Twins in the World Series, it could be a track meet. The Cardinals lead the majors in stolen bases, and the Twins' opponents have been successful stealing 78 percent of the time. . .

Bo Jackson says he won't cross an NFL picket line. What he hasn't said is if he'll go to the Florida Instructional League for a couple of weeks. The Kansas City Royals have asked, but he has only said he'll take 10 days or so off after the season, then decide. That would seem to rule out Florida, as there'd be only a couple of weeks left.

It's going to be a long winter of reevaluation for the Royals, who'll finish last in runs for the second straight season. They'd like to add a shortstop and catcher, but unlike past years, when they had pitchers Scott Bankhead and David Cone, the Royals are pretty well depleted.

They would part with either Mark Gubicza or Danny Jackson, but both have lost 18 games. Jackson (9-18, 4.02) has been an especial disappointment. He began the season as one of the highest valued left-handers in the game and was Sports Illustrated's pick for the Cy Young Award.

Davis Taking Rap

The Houston Astros are playing out a disappointing season, having gone 10-28 since Aug. 24 (through Thursday). They lost 16 of their last 18 on the road, and much of the blame is directed at first baseman Glenn Davis, who has 90 RBI despite hitting in the low .200s since the all-star break and leaving a ton of runners on.

There has been speculation that owner John McMullen might fire either General Manager Dick Wagner or Manager Hal Lanier. The complaint against Wagner is that shortstop Buddy Biancalana is the only major league player he has dealt for in the last year. But Wagner was brought in by McMullen to cut costs, and he has done that. The Astros will turn a small profit after losing $4 million in 1985. They will finish just shy of two million home attendance . . .

George Frazier of the Minnesota Twins probably hopes for a chance to pitch in the World Series more than some of the other Twins. As a member of the 1981 New York Yankees, he went 0-3 with a 17.18 ERA in the World Series. He's the only big leaguer to lose three games and not get accused of trying to throw a Series. The other three-game loser was Lefty Williams of the 1919 Black Sox . . .

Charlie Hough won Tuesday night to end the Rangers' seven-game losing streak. Since he went into their rotation in 1982, they've had 67 losing streaks of three or more games, and he has stopped 24 of them . . . There are confusing signals from Cleveland. Manager Doc Edwards hasn't been rehired for 1988, and there have been reports that team president Dan O'Brien could be in some trouble. Baltimore's Hank Peters has been rumored as a replacement for O'Brien for more than a month . . .

Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott wants to cut her scouting staff to a bare-bones six or so (down from 30). She has complained that all those guys do is go around and watch baseball games. She has been told that watching games is how Eric Davis, Tracy Jones and Barry Larkin were discovered, but she doesn't buy that . . .

Before this season, Don Mattingly was 12 for 47 with one extra base hit with the bases loaded. This year, he is nine for 19 (.474) with six grand slams, a three-run double, two singles and two sacrifice flies. Result: 33 RBI . . .

Although Yankees owner George Steinbrenner hasn't said yet, the betting is that Manager Lou Piniella will be shifted elsewhere in the organization. Almost everyone outside the organization believes Piniella has done a decent job with a mediocre team, but decent has never been good enough for Steinbrenner. Billy Martin or Bucky Dent are considered the most likely replacements. . .

Philadelphia Phillies shortstop Steve Jeltz is the only major leaguer who was on a major league roster on opening day and during the season made more errors (13) than the number of runs he batted in (12) . . . Houston's right-handed-hitting shortstops have totaled five RBI . . .

It wasn't a good season for the National League's 12 opening day pitchers: four of them went on the disabled list (Montreal's Floyd Youmans, St. Louis' John Tudor, New York's Bobby Ojeda and San Francisco's Mike Krukow); two were dropped from their rotations (Atlanta's Rick Mahler and Houston's Bob Knepper); and two were sent to the minors (Cincinnati's Tom Browning and Pittsburgh's Bob Patterson). In all, the 12 were 119-119.Quote of the Week

"We had a helluva week. We tied for the championship in Atlanta, we won it in San Diego and we almost lost it in Los Angeles." -- Giants Manager Roger Craig after fleeing a hotel during the earthquake.