Alan Wiggins, catalyst to the San Diego Padres' only championship season before he went on to the Baltimore Orioles and his baseball career was cut short by drug problems, is dead at 32.

"He died at 9:45 {Sunday} evening," said a spokesman at Los Angeles' Cedars-Sinai Hospital. "Pneumonia, tuberculosis and other medical complications is what I've been given as cause of death."

Wiggins played parts of three seasons for the Orioles until he was suspended indefinitely by then-commissioner Peter Ueberroth Aug. 31, 1987, after reportedly failing a drug test. The Orioles subsequently released Wiggins following weeks of negotiations among his agent, the club, Ueberroth's office and the players union.

Wiggins made it full time with the Padres midway through the 1982 season, but that July also marked the first of several drug-related incidents, an arrest for cocaine possession during a traffic stop by San Diego police. He was suspended for 30 days by then-commissioner Bowie Kuhn after completing a month's rehabilitation program, then returned to the Padres.

An outfielder, Wiggins was moved to first base for the final 45 games of the 1983 season when Steve Garvey broke his thumb. He batted .276, stole 66 bases and was voted club MVP. The Padres tried Wiggins at second base the next spring, an experiment that helped win them the NL pennant; he hit .341 in the postseason, including .364 in the World Series loss to Detroit.

He had been a model player from his 1982 arrest until he mysteriously vanished hours before an April 25, 1985, game against the Dodgers in Los Angeles. He surfaced two days later in a drug rehabilitation facility. Club owner Joan Kroc said Wiggins would again play for San Diego, and he was traded June 27, 1985, to Baltimore for pitchers Rich Caldwell and Roy Lee Jackson. . . .

Yesterday, while snow coated the Memorial Stadium field, several Baltimore Orioles began informal workouts by throwing and hitting underneath the right field stands.

Pitchers Pete Harnisch, Kevin Hickey, Curt Schilling and Mike Linskey and catcher Chris Hoiles -- all on the Orioles' 40-man roster -- participated in the workouts designed to ease the shock of spring training a bit more than a month away. . . .

The Orioles agreed to a one-year contract worth $375,000 with infielder Tim Hulett. Hulett, 30, hit .255 in 53 games in 1990. He broke his left hand just before the season and missed 10 weeks.

Hulett was eligible for salary arbitration, but with his signing only five Orioles (Kevin Hickey, Mark Williamson, Bill Ripken, Rene Gonzales, Joe Orsulak) are eligible for arbitration. . . .

The Oakland Athletics, responding to the questionable status of third baseman Carney Lansford after his recent snowmobile accident, signed veteran infielder Vance Law.

Law, 34, who spent the 1990 season with the Chunichi Dragons of Japan and hit .313 with 29 home runs and 78 RBI, played in the majors 1980-89 with the Pirates, White Sox and Cubs. . . .

Bill Lajoie, 56, has resigned as Detroit Tigers' vice president and general manager to pursue "a more relaxed lifestyle."

"After 36 years in baseball, I've decided to step back and enjoy a few things in life," he said in a statement released by the Tigers. . . .

Rod Carew, seven-time AL batting champion and a good bet to make the Hall of Fame today on his first opportunity, will serve the Cleveland Indians as a base running and bunting instructor in spring training and periodically during the season at both the major league and minor league levels. . . .

Services will be Wednesday for Bill Byrd, the fourth-winningest pitcher in the old Negro leagues. He died Friday in Philadelphia at 83.

Despite his pitching statistics, he was too old to make the switch to the major leagues when baseball was integrated in 1947. "He was born 20 years too early," said Byrd's wife Hazel. "By the time all that came about, Bill was about 40."

Byrd was 115-72 during his 17-year career (much of it with the Elite Giants in Washington and Baltimore), according to Macmillan's Baseball Encyclopedia. The only Negro league pitchers with more official wins were Andy Cooper with 118, Satchel Paige with 123 and Bill Foster with 137.