SONY HAS to be ecstatic with how “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” is running the table — nailing every shot up its red-and-blue sleeve.

First, “Into the Spider-Verse” won over critics (87 score on Metacritic; 97 percent “fresh” on Rotten Tomatoes). Then the first wave of filmgoers thrummed with excitement (“A-plus” CinemaScore from opening day audiences).

“Spider-Verse,” which introduces the comics’ popular Miles Morales to the big screen, grossed $35.4 million in its domestic debut, according to studio estimates (final numbers are due Monday afternoon). It almost set the record for an animated movie’s December three-day opening, but Universal/Illumination’s “Sing” had a five-day opening of $55.8 million in 2016 and earned $35.2 million in the Friday-to-Sunday portion of that, which would top “Spider-Verse” if you account for inflation.

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Although animated films generally skew younger, more than 40 percent of the PG-rated “Spider-Verse” audience was older than 24, according to Box Office Mojo. Nearly two-thirds of its opening-weekend viewers were male.

“Spider-Verse” is already a Golden Globe nominee for best animated motion picture, and it is well poised for an Oscars nod when the Academy Award nominations are announced next month.

“Spider-Verse,” which has a production budget of $90 million, has already grossed $56.4 million worldwide and should enjoy a healthy holiday run — even as “Aquaman” and “Bumblebee” open this month.

Sony’s “Spider-Man” franchise has now grossed nearly $5 billion worldwide since Sam Raimi’s first Peter Parker film struck gold in 2002. The Spider-Man/Peter Parker character was created by Steve Ditko and Stan Lee, both of whom died this year.

The year’s biggest opening for an animated superhero movie is Disney/Pixar’s “Incredibles 2,” which had a domestic debut of $182.7 million in June.

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