(by Clay Bennett / Chattanooga Times Free Press / WPWG 2019/by Clay Bennett / Chattanooga Times Free Press / WPWG 2019)
Writer/critic

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III had a job: Deliver his 448-page report about his investigation into Russian interference in the presidential election.

Once that redacted report was made public Thursday, political cartoonists had one job: Synthesize the news into a one-sheet visual take on President Trump and takeaways from Mueller’s portrait.

Was there indeed “no collusion,” as Trump and Attorney General William P. Barr insisted? Or were Democratic leaders right to maintain that Trump’s conduct “amounted to obstruction of justice and necessitated further inquiry,” as The Washington Post reported?

Meanwhile, although satirists are accustomed to lampooning how Trump responds to criticism, their latest work reflects the degree to which many have found a new target in Barr.

Here is how the first wave of cartoons has satirized the political optics and jockeying to frame the Mueller report:

Steve Sack (Minneapolis Star Tribune):


(Steve Sack / Minneapolis Star Tribune / CagleCartoons.com 2019/Steve Sack / Minneapolis Star Tribune / CagleCartoons.com 2019)

Christopher Weyant (Boston Globe):


(by Christopher Weyant / Boston Globe 2019/by Christopher Weyant / Boston Globe 2019)

Nate Beeler (Columbus Dispatch):


(by Nate Beeler / Columbus Dispatch / CagleCartoons.com 2019/by Nate Beeler / Columbus Dispatch / CagleCartoons.com 2019)

David Fitzsimmons (Arizona Daily Star):


(by David Fitzsimmons / Arizona Daily Star / CagleCartoons.com 2019/by David Fitzsimmons / Arizona Daily Star / CagleCartoons.com 2019)

Lisa Benson (WPWG):


(by Lisa Benson / WPWG/by Lisa Benson / WPWG)

Tom Toles (The Washington Post):


(by Tom Toles / The Washington Post 2019/by Tom Toles / The Washington Post 2019)

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