The Golden Globes tend to be the strangest night of award season — blame it on the alcohol! — and this year was no exception. The ceremony adopted the same structure as its covid-era predecessors, with hosts and presenters appearing in person while award recipients and nominees video-chatted in from their homes, offices and hotel rooms. Technical difficulties were to be expected, and the Globes didn’t make us wait long. Daniel Kaluuya, who won the very first award of the night, almost didn’t get to give his speech after producers seemingly forgot to unmute his audio.

But for a speech that went smoothly — and one the Hollywood Foreign Press Association might want to revisit — look no further than Jane Fonda, who was awarded the honorary Cecil B. DeMille award for her accomplishments as an actress and activist. While the HFPA’s own response to the controversy over its lack of any Black members was lackluster, Fonda directly implored industry gatekeepers to diversify their hiring pools, greenlight recipients and award winners “so that everyone rises and everyone’s story has a chance to be seen and heard.”

As for the winners, Netflix swept on the television side of things; Chloé Zhao won best director and drama film for “Nomadland”; and Sacha Baron Cohen landed best actor and comedy film for “Borat Subsequent Moviefilm.”

Keep scrolling to revisit the night’s events.

Highlights
4:03 a.m.
Link copied
link

‘Nomadland’ wins best motion picture drama

Best director winner Chloé Zhao triumphed again in the biggest category of the night for her story about a widow (Frances McDormand) who travels the country in an RV after losing her financial safety net during the Great Recession. Zhao channeled her film’s message as she accepted the award, calling the film “a pilgrimage through grief and healing.”

“So for everyone who has gone through this difficult and beautiful journey at some point in their lives, this is for you,” Zhao said before quoting a line from the award-winning film: “We don’t say ‘goodbye,’ we say ‘see you down the road.’”

4:00 a.m.
Link copied
link

Andra Day wins best actress in a drama

The singer won for her portrayal of legendary artist Billie Holiday in “The United States vs. Billie Holiday.”

It was Day’s debut starring role in a film — a film that has received mixed reviews — that delves into Holiday’s role as a political player in the racial prejudices of the U.S. government’s war on drugs.

3:52 a.m.
Link copied
link

Sacha Baron Cohen wins best actor, comedy or musical for ‘Borat Subsequent Moviefilm’

“Borat Subsequent Moviefilm” also won best film, comedy or musical. After joking that former president Donald Trump had contested the results, Cohen once again thanked everyone he worked with on the film — including a “bodyguard who stopped me getting shot twice.”

3:46 a.m.
Link copied
link

Sacha Baron Cohen thanks ‘talented newcomer’ Rudy Giuliani after win for ‘Borat Subsequent Moviefilm’

Sacha Baron Cohen’s “Borat” sequel won best motion picture, comedy or musical — the same category the first movie was up for in 2007. The comedian thanked a “talented newcomer” who starred in the film, but he didn’t mean breakout Maria Bakalova, who earned acclaim (and a Golden Globe nod) for her role as Borat’s daughter. No, he was thanking Rudy Giuliani, who appeared in the movie’s most jaw-dropping scene. Cohen noted that the former New York mayor, an ally of former president Donald Trump, went on to star in “a string of comedy films” including “Four Seasons Landscaping” and “Hair Dye Another Day.”

Cohen did eventually thank Bakalova, whom he called “incredible.” He also thanked the film’s crew, noting that they risked arrest and coronavirus to get the hotly anticipated sequel made.

3:37 a.m.
Link copied
link

Chloé Zhao wins best director

The Chinese-born director won for “Nomadland.”

The film is nominated for best picture and actress (Frances McDormand) in the drama category, and was already seen as an early favorite at the upcoming Academy Awards before tonight. McDormand plays a woman whose town is decimated by the Great Recession and lives the life of a modern nomad traveling the American West living out of her van and working odd, seasonal jobs to make ends meet.

3:33 a.m.
Link copied
link

Chadwick Boseman posthumously wins best drama actor for ‘Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom’

Boseman’s wife, Simone Ledward Boseman, accepted the award on behalf of the actor, who died of cancer in August.

“He would thank God, he would thank his parents, he would thank his ancestors for their guidance,” she said, adding: “He would say something beautiful, something inspiring, something that would amplify that little voice inside all of us that tells you can, that tells you to keep going, that calls you back to what you are meant to be doing in this moment in history.”

After thanking her late husband’s “Ma Rainey” collaborators, Ledward Boseman concluded: “I don’t have his words. But we have to take all the moments to celebrate those we love, so thank you, HFPA, for this opportunity to do exactly that. And honey, you keep 'em coming. Thank you.”

3:31 a.m.
Link copied
link

Production issues plague the Golden Globes

The Golden Globes production hasn’t been up to the standard set by other covid-era live shows, such as the superior Emmy Awards and Democratic National Convention. A comparable example might be the Super Bowl halftime show, though, which also suffered from poor audio quality. The sound issues are particularly notable when there is “crowd” reaction, which has a tinny quality.

The video-chatting format has also proved a bit glitchy, with typical Zoom issues persisting during the ceremony. Early on, best supporting actor Daniel Kaluuya appeared to be muted as the feed turned to him for the acceptance speech. The presenter started to pivot until Kaluuya’s audio finally began to work: “You did me dirty!” he exclaimed. “Am I on? Is this on?”

3:26 a.m.
Link copied
link

‘The Queen’s Gambit’ wins best limited series

Minutes after Anya Taylor-Joy’s win for best actress, the Netflix chess juggernaut won best limited series. Creator Scott Frank joked that the rights to Walter Tevis’s 1983 book of the same name were secured by his co-creator Allen Frank “before Anya Taylor-Joy was born.”

3:24 a.m.
Link copied
link

Anya Taylor-Joy wins best actress in a limited series, anthology or television movie

The young actress won the award for her role in the popular Netflix series “The Queen’s Gambit.”

Taylor-Joy played Beth Harmon, a chess wunderkind, as she gets her start in Kentucky on her path to becoming a chess grandmaster. The American-born actress grew up in Argentina and Great Britain and has seen her star rise since starring in 2015′s “The Witch,” an arthouse horror film.

3:18 a.m.
Link copied
link

Jane Fonda calls for diversity during Cecil B. DeMille Award speech

While accepting the Cecil B. DeMille Award, handed out for “outstanding contributions to the world of entertainment,” Jane Fonda called for increased diversity in Hollywood. The segment began with a handful of celebrities praising Fonda’s achievements as an actress and activist, including Kerry Washington, who noted that “there is a lot of glass on the floor from all of the ceilings that she has shattered.”

Fonda accepted the award in person at the Beverly Hilton in Los Angeles and gave a speech that began by recognizing the power storytellers have to “change our hearts and minds.”

“I’ve seen a lot of diversity in my long life and at times I’ve been challenged to understand some of the people I’ve met, but inevitably if my heart is open and I look beneath the surface, I feel kinship,” she said. “That’s why all the great conduits of perception — Buddha, Muhammad, Jesus, Lao Tzu — all of them spoke to us in stories and poetry and metaphor. Because the nonlinear, non-cerebral forms that are art speak on a different frequency. They generate a new energy that can zolt us open and penetrate our defenses so we can see and hear what we may not have been seeing and hearing.”

The actress and activist praised nominated films such as “Nomadland” and “Minari” for helping her understand other communities, as well as “Judas and the Black Messiah,” “Small Axe,” “The United States vs. Billie Holiday,” “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” and “One Night in Miami” for deepening “my empathy for what being Black has meant.”

She also acknowledged television series such as “Ramy” and “I May Destroy You,” the latter of which was notably snubbed by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.

“But there’s been a story we’ve been afraid to see and hear about ourselves in this industry — a story about which voices we respect and elevate and which we tune out, a story about who’s offered a seat at the table and who is kept out of the rooms where decisions are made,” Fonda continued. “So let’s all of us, including all the groups that decide who gets hired and what gets made and who wins awards, let’s all of us make an effort to expand that tent so that everyone rises and everyone’s story has a chance to be seen and heard.”

3:16 a.m.
Link copied
link

Gillian Anderson wins best supporting actress in a TV role for ‘The Crown’

The actress has received rave reviews for her turn as Margaret Thatcher in Netflix’s royal period drama. Her acceptance speech included a shout out to Cate Hall, the hair and makeup designer who helped nail the world-renowned prime minister’s coiffure or, as Anderson called it, the “Thatcher helmet thing.”

3:15 a.m.
Link copied
link

Jodie Foster wins best supporting actress

The actress won for “The Mauritanian,” where she plays a defense attorney for a prisoner at Guantánamo Bay.

The film will premiere on April 1 on Amazon Prime Video, but until recently, Foster’s name was most prominent in the news because Green Bay Packers star quarterback Aaron Rodgers thanked her in accepting the NFL’s Most Valuable Player award. (Foster returned the favor tonight in her speech.) Some believed Foster, a Packers fan, set up Rodgers and “Mauritanian” co-star Shailene Woodley.

2:56 a.m.
Link copied
link

‘The Crown’ wins best TV drama

Netflix’s royal period drama is having a great night. Following acting wins by Emma Corrin and Josh O’Connor — for playing Princess Diana and Prince Charles, respectively — the series won best TV drama. Creator Peter Morgan lamented being in his “tragic little office” as opposed to sitting next to the cast and crew that make the award-winning series.

2:55 a.m.
Link copied
link

‘Minari’ wins best foreign language film

The American film starring Steven Yeun won the award for the category in which it was controversially placed.

“Minari” tells the semi-autobiographical tale of director Lee Isaac Chung — who accepted the award with his young daughter beside him — and his upbringing in rural Arkansas. While the film was made entirely in the United States, its dialogue swings from primarily Korean to English and so was not allowed to compete for best drama according to the HFPA’s guidelines. And yet its American roots were ironically acknowledged when it was announced as a nominee, accompanied by its country of entry: “Minari, U.S.A.”

“Minari is about a family,” Chung said in his speech. “It’s about a family trying to learn how to speak a language of its own. It goes deeper than any American language and any foreign language — it’s a language of the heart.”