Nobody knew what to expect from the 93rd Academy Awards, but we definitely didn’t expect that.

The announcement of categories were mixed around this year, with best picture notably arriving before the two lead acting categories. Front-runner “Nomadland” took home the trophy, followed by its star and best actress winner Frances McDormand. The film’s director, Chloé Zhao, also became the first woman of color to win best director.

The whole night built up to the final category: best actor, presumed to be the late Chadwick Boseman of “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom,” who has posthumously swept award season up until this point. Instead, the prize went to Anthony Hopkins of “The Father,” who didn’t attend the ceremony, leaving the show without a final acceptance speech. And with that, the Oscars were over.

The anticlimactic ending fell in line with the rest of the telecast, which producers had said from the start would be an unusual one. The Oscars were a fine award ceremony, expressing true appreciation of the art (most of the time, anyway) and allowing each recipient however much time they wanted to share their thoughts and gratitude. But they lacked the qualities that keep at-home viewers engaged, be it lighthearted bits (aside from Glenn Close’s go-go knowledge, that is) or enlightening clips from the nominated films.

It was a fittingly bizarre end to the most bizarre award season yet. Here’s a closer look at how the night unfolded.

Keep scrolling to revisit the night’s events.

Highlights

3:21 a.m.
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Sonia Rao: This year’s show mixed it up by handing out best picture before the lead acting categories, inadvertently ending the night on a dud note. After Frances McDormand accepted her best actress trophy for “Nomadland,” which also won best picture, the only category remaining was best actor. The winner? Anthony Hopkins, star of “The Father” who did not attend the ceremony (and who beat out the presumed front-runner, the late Chadwick Boseman). A very strange Academy Awards, at the end of a very strange award season, ended with a shrug.
Sonia Rao, Pop culture reporter

Anthony Hopkins wins best actor for ‘The Father’

3:18 a.m.
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In a surprise end to the night, Hopkins won for his role as a man suffering dementia in “The Father.” The 83-year-old British actor was absent for the night and did not give a speech.

Chadwick Boseman, who died of cancer last year, had been seen as the favorite to win the award for his final role in “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom.” Boseman had already earned many of the acting trophies that precede the Oscars, including the Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild awards.

The Hopkins-less best actor presentation marked an abrupt end to a semi-quarantined ceremony, which had already seen a slew of production quirks straying from the typical Oscars night.

Frances McDormand wins best actress for ‘Nomadland’

3:15 a.m.
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After accepting the best picture award a few minutes earlier, McDormand took the stage again to accept the award for her performance in the same film.

The famously modest actress kept her speech short and sweet, quoting a few lines of “Macbeth” before closing with a note of gratitude.

“I have no words," McDormand said. “My voice is in my sword. We know that the sword is our work, and I like work. Thank you for knowing that, and thanks for this.”

‘Nomadland’ wins best picture

3:07 a.m.
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The film was the favorite heading into the night, and ultimately won the award despite being shut out of most prior awards, except best director for Chloé Zhao.

In a surprise, best picture wasn’t the final award announced for the night. The already unusual ceremony will end with the awards for best actor and actress.

Zhao accepted the award and thanked the cast of real-life nomadic actors for their stories and performance in the film. She then handed it off to lead actress Frances McDormand, who urged people to watch “Nomadland” and the other films nominated throughout the night “on the biggest screen possible.”

2:52 a.m.
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Emily Yahr: No one expected this year’s Oscars to be a spectacle, considering the pandemic-era restrictions, but did anyone expect it to be so slow? The first genuinely entertaining moment of the snoozeworthy night came at 10:41 p.m., when Lil Rel Howery (who co-hosted some of the red carpet pre-show) decided it was a great time to play a game of Oscars trivia quizzing the nominees on various songs that did or didn’t win an Oscar. It ended with Andra Day getting bleeped and Glenn Close dancing to legendary D.C. go-go group Experience Unlimited’s “Da Butt,” and notably, the first actual big laughter of the night.
Emily Yahr, Style reporter covering pop culture and entertainment
2:47 a.m.
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Bethonie Butler: One line of Tyler Perry’s speech, which he gave while accepting the academy’s annual Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, is raising eyebrows. “I refuse to hate someone because they are Mexican or because they are Black or White or LBGTQ,” Perry said. “I refuse to hate someone because they are a police officer. I refuse to hate someone because they are Asian.” It was Perry’s mention of “a police officer” that drew ire — in a classic case of which of these things do not belong? As many viewers noted on social media, policing is a profession and not analogous to being a person of color or a member of the LGBTQ community.
Bethonie Butler, Reporter covering television and pop culture

‘Fight For You’ from ‘Judas and the Black Messiah’ wins for best original song

2:47 a.m.
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“Fight For You," performed by R&B artist H.E.R., won best original song. Earlier this year, H.E.R. won song of the year at the Grammys for “I Can’t Breathe."

This was H.E.R.'s first Oscar win, and the second win of the night for “Judas and the Black Messiah."

It also marked the 12th consecutive disappointment for Diane Warren, who was nominated in the category for “Io sì (Seen)” this year, and for 11 previous songs dating back to 1988, always without a win.

‘Soul’ wins for best original score

2:36 a.m.
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Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross and Jon Batiste won for “Soul,” which also took the best animated feature category earlier in the night.

Reznor and Ross were also nominated in the best original score category for their work on “Mank.”

‘Sound of Metal’ wins for best film editing

2:22 a.m.
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Mikkel E. G. Nielsen won the category for “Sound of Metal,” which previously won for best sound.

The Denmark-born film editor praised the country for funding film schools that helped hone his craft.

‘Mank’ wins for best cinematography

2:13 a.m.
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Erik Messerschmidt won the film’s second award of the night, after “Mank” took best production design just a few minutes earlier.

2:12 a.m.
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Bethonie Butler: Yuh-jung Youn, who earned a best supporting actress nod for “Minari,” became the first Korean woman to win an acting award at the Oscars. And her speech, like the others she’s given this award season, did not disappoint. Accepting the award from Brad Pitt (“Nice to meet you,” she told the actor, who won best supporting actor last year), Youn referenced the many different ways her name has been (mis)pronounced on the awards circuit. “Tonight, you are all forgiven,” she joked. Youn thanked the “family” she found in her “Minari” co-stars and the film’s director Isaac Lee Chung. Addressing her fellow nominees, she said she doesn’t “believe in competition.” Her win came down to “a little luck,” she said, and perhaps “American hospitality for a Korean actor.” Youn’s historic milestone followed Daniel Kaluuya’s best supporting actor win for “Judas and the Black Messiah” earlier in the ceremony, increasing the likelihood that all four acting awards could go to people of color.
Bethonie Butler, Reporter covering television and pop culture

‘Mank’ wins for best production design

2:09 a.m.
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“Mank" snagged the award for best production design. The film, about the writing of the 1941 classic “Citizen Kane,” paid tribute to Hollywood movies of that era. Director David Fincher insisted it be shot in black and white.

2:03 a.m.
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Emily Yahr: So far, producers have only included actual movie clips in two categories: animated feature and documentary feature. Otherwise, they have largely relied on presenters to explain why the special effects or acting was so effective in each category as they introduce the nominees. Again, this is quite a choice considering that film is, you know, visual.
Emily Yahr, Style reporter covering pop culture and entertainment
1:56 a.m.
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Sonia Rao: Brad Pitt appearing on the Oscars stage approximately two hours into the ceremony has the same energy as hot Brad Pitt appearing approximately halfway (?) into the lengthy runtime of “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.”
Sonia Rao, Pop culture reporter
1:53 a.m.
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Sonia Rao: As a televised award show, the Oscars are tasked with properly honoring artists while still keeping the attention of viewers at home. Regardless of how you feel about the actual winners list, this year’s ceremony has clearly accomplished the first task, touching on each nominee’s work and allowing every winner the time to express their gratitude. The second? Depends on how you feel about the usual pomp and circumstance being MIA.
Sonia Rao, Pop culture reporter
1:48 a.m.
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Bethonie Butler: A few awards in, we said we didn’t mind that the producers decided against playing off winners if their speeches went too long. But several rambling speeches later, we have a newfound appreciation for well-placed exit music.
Bethonie Butler, Reporter covering television and pop culture
1:20 a.m.
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Sonia Rao: The sound design in “Sound of Metal” could be described as experimental, at times dropping to near-silence or mimicking the high-pitched ringing that its protagonist, Ruben (Riz Ahmed), would be experiencing as he begins to lose his hearing. Sound designer Nicolas Becker, who accepted the Oscar for best sound, told The Post last year that “the idea was to make it really, really naturalistic.”
Sonia Rao, Pop culture reporter
1:04 a.m.
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Sonia Rao: With this win for “Nomadland,” Chloé Zhao has become the first woman of color to win the Oscar for best director. She is also the second woman to ever do so, following Kathryn Bigelow’s win for “The Hurt Locker” in 2010.
Sonia Rao, Pop culture reporter
1:00 a.m.
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Bethonie Butler: The Oscars are more diverse than ever this year, and while most of the focus has been on long overdue milestones in the acting and directing categories, there are historic nominations across the board. Mia Neal and Jamika King became the first Black women to win in the makeup and hairstyling category, sharing the trophy with Sergio Lopez-Rivera, for their work on “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom.” “I know one day it won’t be groundbreaking or unusual,” Neal said of the achievement during the trio’s acceptance speech. “It will just be normal.”
Bethonie Butler, Reporter covering television and pop culture
12:57 a.m.
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Sonia Rao: The producers appear to love a good walk-and-talk (shout out best original screenplay nominee Aaron Sorkin, I guess?) and decided to make Bryan Cranston hang out in the Dolby Theatre all alone as he walk-and-introduced the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award.
Sonia Rao, Pop culture reporter
12:55 a.m.
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Emily Yahr: The Oscars are, shall we say, quite verbose this year. Typically, producers show clips of the films that the actors are nominated for — you know, so viewers can see their work. This time, presenters are paying tribute to the nominees themselves with brief speeches. (Apparently no one told Sacha Baron Cohen about this, as he looked startled when Laura Dern started going on about his great performance while he appeared on-camera via satellite from Australia.) Plus, there were no photos or clips of the hair and makeup or costume nominees, only descriptions of the looks … which doesn’t seem ideal.
Emily Yahr, Style reporter covering pop culture and entertainment
12:45 a.m.
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Bethonie Butler: Awards shows tend to play actors off the stage regardless of how inspiring their speeches are, but that doesn’t seem to be in order at the Oscars this year (the producers hinted they would not be doing this). We’ve already heard some pretty lengthy speeches, including Daniel Kaluuya’s best supporting actor acceptance, and we don’t mind it — so far, at least. If you win an Oscar, you probably deserve to say whatever is on your mind — even if it’s thanking your parents for conceiving you (as Kaluuya did, to his sister’s horror). “My mom, my dad, they had sex,” he said. “That’s amazing!”
Bethonie Butler, Reporter covering television and pop culture
12:27 a.m.
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Sonia Rao: Ending a film with a dance scene isn’t the most innovative idea. But with best international feature film “Another Round,” director Thomas Vinterberg made it feel fresh — in large part thanks to star Mads Mikkelsen, who was a professional dancer for roughly a decade before he trained to become an actor.
Sonia Rao, Pop culture reporter
12:26 a.m.
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Bethonie Butler: The producers of this year’s unusual Oscars ceremony teased that the show would feel very much like the films it’s celebrating — right down to the strict coronavirus protocols. (Regina King, whose directorial debut “One Night in Miami” is up for three awards, assured viewers that everyone involved has been “vaxxed, tested and retested.”) The producers also promised that the ceremony would give us insights on the nominees and their personal connections to the movie industry. This, it turns out, is the ceremony for trivia heads. Ahead of the best original screenplay category, which Emerald Fennell won for “Promising Young Woman,” we learned that “Judas and the Black Messiah” director Shaka King, who co-wrote the film’s screenplay, fell in love with films while working as a movie extra. His co-screenwriter Will Berson used to be the office manager for John Leguizamo’s production company. “Minari” director and screenwriter Lee Isaac Chung was so enthralled with “E.T.” as a child that he stood up in the theater while watching. Aaron Sorkin used to serve popcorn at his neighborhood theater. But the award for most impressive factoid (also) goes to Fennell: As Regina King recalled, the “Promising Young Woman” director was seven months pregnant — and on a break from her role as Camilla Shand (as in Camilla Parker Bowles) for “The Crown” — during the 27-day shoot for her film, which earned lead Carey Mulligan a best actress nod. “Girl, you earned the title of that film,” King told the 35-year-old Fennell.
Bethonie Butler, Reporter covering television and pop culture
12:14 a.m.
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Sonia Rao: “Steven, I hope that was all right,” best original screenplay winner Emerald Fennell said at the end of her charming acceptance speech. The “Promising Young Woman” filmmaker was referencing director Steven Soderbergh, who produced the ceremony alongside Stacey Sher and Jesse Collins but, for many reasons, has become the one guy you want to disappoint the least.
Sonia Rao, Pop culture reporter
12:10 a.m.
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Emily Yahr: One of the most common complaints about celebrities speaking at the Oscars is “I don’t want to hear a movie star lecture me about politics!” Regina King addressed this right away in an opening monologue, saying that if the verdict in the Derek Chauvin case had gone differently, she might have skipped the show to march in a protest: “I know that a lot of you people at home want to reach for the remote when you feel like Hollywood is preaching to you. But as a mother of a Black son, I know the fear that so many live with. And no amount of fame or fortune changes that.”
Emily Yahr, Style reporter covering pop culture and entertainment
12:06 a.m.
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Sonia Rao: The show’s opening took advantage of the unusual location, following Regina King as she made her way through Union Station to a stage in front of several banquet-style tables. The introductory credits appeared on-screen as she walked. The! Oscars! Are! Like! A! Movie!
Sonia Rao, Pop culture reporter
11:51 p.m.
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Sonia Rao: It might be worth noting — if only because David Rubin, president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, wants to make sure everyone at home knows — that the Oscars are abiding by covid safety protocols tonight. The ceremony will be shot “like a movie,” as its producers have repeatedly expressed, and will follow the rules set in place for film and television production. Part of this means attendees, who were tested ahead of time, don’t have to wear masks when they appear on camera.
Sonia Rao, Pop culture reporter
11:06 p.m.
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Sonia Rao: The Oscars pre-show has offered glimpses of the courtyard at Los Angeles’s Union Station, where a portion of tonight’s attendees will be seated when they aren’t inside the venue itself. It looks quite like a fancy wedding reception — which makes sense, given that regular wealthy folk can also rent out parts of Union Station for private events — and embodies the glamour that so many virtual award shows have lacked.
Sonia Rao, Pop culture reporter