The Washington Post

How should government regulate ride-sharing?

A few companies are trying to make private ride sharing a reality. SideCar lets anyone sign up, undergo a background check and other reviews, and then become a “community driver” who can offer others rides through the service for a “donation.”

This is part of a wave of startups providing what’s called “collaborative consumption,” where people have an economic arrangement to share a resource. There have been services like time-share vacations and Zipcar car sharing for many years, where a company owns some resources and sells shares in them, but the newer trend is companies that try to help individual people sell unused capacity in stuff they own.

Airbnb, for example, lets you rent out your apartment when you’re not there for extra cash, and makes it possible to find a much more affordable place to stay in busy cities where there aren’t that many hotel rooms.

Regulations, however, often don’t really account for individuals renting out their own stuff. They usually assume that anyone providing such services is a company that does so as its business, and can undergo inspections, file for permits, and so on. Plus, these regulatory processes try to ensure that the products are safe and healthy, that nobody’s getting scammed, and so on.

[Continue reading David Alpert’s post at Greater Greater Washington.]

David Alpert is founder and editor of Greater Greater Washington. The Local Blog Network is a group of bloggers from around the D.C. region who have agreed to make regular contributions to All Opinions Are Local.


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